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OSHA 10 Hour General Awareness Program

OSHA 10 Hour General Awareness Program

The OSHA Outreach Training Program for General Industry provides training for workers and employers on the recognition, avoidance, abatement, and prevention of safety and health hazards in workplaces in general industry. The program also provides information regarding workers' rights, employer responsibilities, and how to file a complaint. This is a voluntary program and does not meet training requirements for any OSHA standards.

$95.00

OSHA Mandatory

  • Intro to OSHA
    • OSHA is the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. It is the main federal agency charged with the enforcement of safety and health legislation. OSHA's mission is to "assure safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women by setting and enforcing standards and by providing training, outreach, education and assistance.”
  • Walking and Working Surfaces
    • Slips, trips, and falls cause the majority of general industry accidents. Fifteen percent of all accidental deaths are caused by slips, trips, and falls. These cause more fatalities than any other accident except motor vehicles. The OSHA standards for walking and working surfaces apply to all permanent places of employment, except where only domestic, mining, or agricultural work is performed. Falls from as little as 4 to 6 feet can cause serious lost-time accidents and sometimes death. The OSHA standard identifies areas or activities where fall protection is needed. The standard clarifies how an employer must provide fall protection for employees, such as identifying and evaluating fall hazards and providing training. Under the standard, employers are able to select fall protection measures compatible with the type of work being performed. The most cited areas of this module, Walking and Working Surfaces, are found in housekeeping requirements, and requirements for guarding floor openings and wall openings. Poor housekeeping and failure to properly guard wall and floor openings results in slips, trips, and falls.
  • Fall Protection
    • Occupational fatalities caused by falls remain a serious public health problem throughout the United States. Data collected by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries indicates that falls are one of the leading causes of traumatic death in the workplace, accounting for 13.7% of such deaths (808 of 5,900) in 2001. During that year, 23 workers died in falls through skylights, 11 died in falls through existing roof openings, and 24 died in falls through existing floor openings. Data from the BLS Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses shows that, during 1999, nearly 300,000 workers in private industry  sustained injuries from falls, resulting in lost time from work. In 1999, an estimated 80 workers were injured in falls through skylights, 100 in falls through existing roof openings, and 617 in falls through existing floor openings. Most injuries occurred in construction, though many injuries occurred in other industries such as manufacturing, retail trade, and services. OSHA emphasizes that workers remain at risk of falling through the floor, roof, skylight, and other openings. There is an increasing effort to identify fall hazards and implement prevention measures for reducing serious injuries and fatal falls.
  • Exit Routes, Emergency Action, and Fire Prevention Plans
    • There is a long and tragic history of workplace fires in this country caused by problems with fire exits and extinguishing systems. OSHA requires employers to provide proper exits, firefighting equipment, and employee training to prevent fire related deaths and injuries in the workplace. Emphasis is on escaping from fires; however, some additional hazards include explosions, earthquakes, bomb threats, toxic vapors, and storms (tornadoes, hurricanes, etc.). Compounding factors that may interfere with a safe escape include panic and confusion, poor visibility, lack of information, and misinformation. These factors frequently cause more injuries and fatalities than the hazard itself.
  • Electrical Safety
    • Roughly 20% of the electricity produced in the United States every year is used to power industrial facilities and equipment. While electricity makes it possible for these facilities to operate, it also poses a very real hazard, with several hundred electricity-related fatalities occurring at the workplace every year. In order to avoid or treat electrical shock, one has to first understand it.
  • Personal Protective Equipment
    • The Occupational Safety and Health Administration, or OSHA, mandates that it is an employer’s duty to provide a personal protective equipment, or PPE, program designed for their workplace. The employee must follow the PPE program and use the PPE required to conform to safe work practices for their particular job. In 2003, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported 4.4 million nonfatal injuries in private industries; this emphasizes the importance of safety in the workplace.
  • Hazardous Communications
    • This module provides an overview of hazardous communication standards. The standards require chemical manufacturers and employers to communicate information to workers about the hazards of workplace chemicals or products. Topics covered include the proper labeling of hazards, the NFPA Diamond, material safety data sheets, and proper implementation of hazardous communication programs.

OSHA Elective

  • Hazardous Materials
    • This module identifies common industrial hazardous materials as determined by regulating agencies such as the EPA and OSHA, describes the handling and disposal of hazardous materials, and introduces related safety precautions and regulations.
  • Materials Handling
    • The efficient handling and storing of materials is vital to industry. These operations provide continuous flow of raw materials, parts, and assemblies through the workplace, and ensure that materials are available when needed. Yet, the improper handling and storing of materials can cause costly injuries. Some of the most common causes of material handling injuries are: Improper manual lifting or carrying loads that are too large or heavy Being struck by materials or being caught in pinch points Crushed by machines, falling materials or improperly stored materials Incorrectly cutting ties or securing devices
  • Machine Guarding
    • Crushed hands and arms, severed fingers, blindness - the list of possible machinery-related injuries is as long as it is horrifying. Safeguards are essential for protecting workers from needless and preventable injuries. A good rule to remember is: Any machine part, function, or process that may cause injury must be safeguarded. Where the operation of a machine can injure the operator or other workers, the hazard must be controlled or eliminated.
  • Bloodborne Pathogens
    • “Bloodborne pathogens” means pathogenic microorganisms that are present in human blood and can cause disease. These pathogens include, but are not limited to, hepatitis B virus (HBV), which causes hepatitis B, hepatitis C virus (HCV), which causes hepatitis C, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which causes AIDS, and other pathogens, such as those that cause malaria. Approximately 5.6 million workers in healthcare and other facilities are at risk of exposure to bloodborne pathogens such as HBV, HCV, and HIV. Bloodborne pathogen exposure may occur in many ways, but needlestick injuries are the most common cause. Exposure may also occur through contact of contaminants with the nose, mouth, eyes, or skin.
  • Safety and Health Program
    • Effective management of worker safety and health protection is a decisive factor in reducing the extent and the severity of work-related injuries and illnesses. A good safety and health program addresses all work-related hazards, including those potential hazards that could result from a change in worksite conditions or practices. OSHA’s experience in the Voluntary Protection Program has also indicated that effective management of safety and health protection improves employee morale and productivity, as well as significantly reducing Workers’ Compensation costs and other less obvious costs of work-related injuries and illnesses.
  • Fall Protection
    • Occupational fatalities caused by falls remain a serious public health problem throughout the United States. Data collected by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries indicates that falls are one of the leading causes of traumatic death in the workplace, accounting for 13.7% of such deaths (808 of 5,900) in 2001. During that year, 23 workers died in falls through skylights, 11 died in falls through existing roof openings, and 24 died in falls through existing floor openings. Data from the BLS Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses shows that, during 1999, nearly 300,000 workers in private industry  sustained injuries from falls, resulting in lost time from work. In 1999, an estimated 80 workers were injured in falls through skylights, 100 in falls through existing roof openings, and 617 in falls through existing floor openings. Most injuries occurred in construction, though many injuries occurred in other industries such as manufacturing, retail trade, and services. OSHA emphasizes that workers remain at risk of falling through the floor, roof, skylight, and other openings. There is an increasing effort to identify fall hazards and implement prevention measures for reducing serious injuries and fatal falls.
  • Back Safety & Ergonomics
    • Although back injuries account for no work-related deaths, they do account for a significant amount of human suffering, loss of productivity, and economic burden on compensation systems. Back disorders are one of the leading causes of disability for people in their working years and afflict over 600,000 employees each year. The frequency and economic impact of back injuries and disorders on the workforce are expected to increase over the next several decades as the average age of the workforce increases and medical costs go up.

OSHA Optional

  • Environmental Awareness
    • Since the industrial revolution in the last century, the public has become more concerned about preserving the environment and exploring the benefits of sustainability. Environmental awareness has had a major impact on industry worldwide. It has led to greater scrutiny of all industrial processes because they contribute the largest amount of environmental pollution. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, or EPA, reported in its Toxics Release Inventory, or TRI, that industrial facilities release more than 6.5 billion pounds of toxic chemicals into the environment each year. Of these 6.5 billion pounds, 100 million pounds contain cancer-causing agents. Environmental issues, such as pollution, resource depletion, climate change, and waste management, have forced industry to change processes as a means of reducing its environmental impacts.
  • Fall Protection
    • Occupational fatalities caused by falls remain a serious public health problem throughout the United States. Data collected by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries indicates that falls are one of the leading causes of traumatic death in the workplace, accounting for 13.7% of such deaths (808 of 5,900) in 2001. During that year, 23 workers died in falls through skylights, 11 died in falls through existing roof openings, and 24 died in falls through existing floor openings. Data from the BLS Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses shows that, during 1999, nearly 300,000 workers in private industry sustained injuries from falls, resulting in lost time from work. In 1999, an estimated 80 workers were injured in falls through skylights, 100 in falls through existing roof openings, and 617 in falls through existing floor openings. Most injuries occurred in construction, though many injuries occurred in other industries such as manufacturing, retail trade, and services. OSHA emphasizes that workers remain at risk of falling through the floor, roof, skylight, and other openings. There is an increasing effort to identify fall hazards and implement prevention measures for reducing serious injuries and fatal falls.
  • Fire Safety and Prevention
    • Fire safety is a key element for the successful operation of industrial facilities. Fire damages are estimated to cost approximately $7.5 billion per year. Fire safety refers to the precautions that are taken to prevent or reduce the likelihood of a fire, which may result in death, injury, or property damage. To understand fire safety, it is important to know exactly what fire is and how it works.
  • Industrial Signage
    • This module provides an overview of the common signage found in an industrial facility. Topics covered include how to interpret common signs in an industrial facility, the color code for labels used to identify hazards, and the OSHA color code for floor markings.
  • Lockout/Tagout
    • The purpose of a lockout/tagout program is to establish procedures for placing lockout and/or tagout devices on energy-isolating components. Following these procedures ensures that equipment is de-energized and unexpected startup and/or release of stored energy is prevented. Injuries to personnel during equipment servicing and maintenance are greatly reduced with a properly implemented lockout/tagout program.
  • Hydrogen Sulfide Awareness
    • Hydrogen sulfide, or H2S, is a colorless, flammable, extremely hazardous gas with a “rotten egg” smell. People can smell the “rotten egg” odor of hydrogen sulfide at low concentrations in air. However, with continuous low-level exposure, or at higher concentrations, a person loses his/her ability to smell the gas even though it is still present (olfactory fatigue). This can happen very rapidly, and at high concentrations, the ability to smell the gas can be lost instantaneously. Therefore, DO NOT rely on your sense of smell to indicate the continuing presence of hydrogen sulfide or to warn of hazardous concentrations. In addition, hydrogen sulfide is a highly flammable gas and gas/air mixtures can be explosive. It may travel to sources of ignition and flash back. If ignited, the gas burns to produce toxic vapors and gases, such as sulfur dioxide.
  • Benzene Awareness
    • Benzene is an organic chemical compound that naturally occurs as a component of crude oil. It is a clear, colorless liquid with a distinctive sweet odor. Benzene is flammable and its vapors can form explosive mixtures. Benzene vapors are heavier than air and the vapors may build up or spread along the ground. These vapors can be ignited by open flames or sparks at locations remote from the site at which benzene is handled. Because of benzene’s sweet aroma, it was used as an aftershave in the 19th and early-20th centuries. Bad idea – Benzene is a cancer causing agent and presents significant health risks.
  • Industrial Facility Safety
    • More than 4,000 fatal, and 3 million nonfatal, work-related injuries were reported in the US in 2010. Identifying and understanding industrial hazards helps lower worker risk as well as increase facility safety and efficiency.
$95.00