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Effective and Engaging Industrial Skills Training

Industrial Mechanic

Industrial Mechanic

The Industrial Mechanic program covers the common skills and knowledge sets applicable to all industries that must be mastered for successful job performance in operations and maintenance as well as the overall function of equipment but the parts within it to work effectively with mechanical machinery.

 

The Basics part of the program focuses on entry-level skills and knowledge, presented within an industrial context, necessary to achieve the requisite competency for further specialization. The Mechanics part of the program familiarizes learners with every part, down to the nuts and bolts, of a machine.

$270.00

Overview of Industrial Systems

  • Overview of Industrial Facility Systems
    • This module provides an overview of industrial-scale systems, using comparisons to typical residential systems that are used in everyday life, as well as industrial standards and units of measure. These systems are used to provide examples and practical applications of the content presented in each subsequent subject area.

Safety

  • Industrial Facility Safety
    • This module provides an overview of common industrial facility hazards and protective systems. Specific hazards covered include auditory hazards, high-pressure steam hazards, travelling crane collision hazards, chemical hazards, tool hazards, and hazards related to working in confined spaces. This module also discusses current and voltage dangers, explaining high- and low-voltage hazards, dry and wet conditions, the effects of current on the human body, and the areas of a facility where these hazards may be encountered. Finally, this module describes systems designed to protect both personnel and equipment.
  • Fire Safety
    • This module introduces key elements related to fire safety. Topics covered include the properties of fires and their underlying causes, including the combustion triangle, common fire hazards, and types of fires common in an industrial environment. Additionally, the module provides an overview of the ways in which fires are extinguished, as well as the key elements of fire safety.
  • Hazardous Communications
    • This module provides an overview of hazardous communication standards. The standards require chemical manufacturers and employers to communicate information to workers about the hazards of workplace chemicals or products. Topics covered include the proper labeling of hazards, the NFPA Diamond, material safety data sheets, and proper implementation of hazardous communication programs.
  • Lockout Tagout
    • This module provides an overview of an OSHA compliant lockout/tagout program, including how to recognize the various locks and tags that may be used. In addition, the module introduces the responsibilities of the authorized team member in regards to a lockout/tagout program to prevent injuries to personnel during the servicing and maintenance of equipment from sources of stored energy.
  • Electrical Safety
    • This module provides an overview of the knowledge necessary to protect personnel and equipment from electrical hazards. Topics covered include the effects of current on the human body and emergency actions that should be taken in the event of an electrical shock. This module also explains the importance of electrical safeguarding, including the use of personal protective equipment and how to ensure that electrical equipment is de-energized.
  • Industrial Signage
    • This module provides an overview of the common signage found in an industrial facility. Topics covered include how to interpret common signs in an industrial facility, the color code for labels used to identify hazards, and the OSHA color code for floor markings.
  • Personal Protective Equipment
    • This module discusses the need for personal protective equipment (PPE) to reduce employee exposure to hazards. Topics covered include personal responsibilities regarding PPE, PPE that is commonly associated with industrial sites, and the proper care, use, and inspection of PPE. Finally, this module will explain the effects of using defective or incorrect PPE, including shock hazards, hardhat scenarios, and the risks of poorly rigged equipment falling on workers.
  • First Aid I
    • This module provides guidance for effective responses and treatment related to external bleeding, burns, and nervous system injuries. Topics covered include OSHA compliant first aid kits and how an injured person should be evaluated. In addition, this module provides an overview of how to control external bleeding, the treatment of minor burns, and how to care for head, neck, and spinal injuries.
  • First Aid II
    • This module provides an overview of basic first aid care. Topics covered include actions to take when poisoning is suspected or someone is choking. The module also explains how to perform CPR and the procedures for operating an AED device. Finally, this module describes how to identify the symptoms of a stroke.
  • Benzene Awareness
    • This course will cover the awareness training of benzene and will answer questions such as: What is benzene? What are the health risks? Who is at risk for exposure? This course will also discuss the OSHA regulatory limits, personal protective equipment, and emergency procedures associated with benzene.

Mathematics

  • Whole Numbers
    • This module provides an overview of mathematical functions using whole numbers. The topics in this module define whole numbers, natural numbers, integers, rational numbers, and real numbers, as well as explain how they are used in an industrial setting. In addition, this module describes mathematical operations using whole numbers, including addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division.
  • Fractions
    • This module provides an overview of mathematical functions using fractions. The topics in this module define fractions and explain how they are used in an industrial setting. This module also explains the individual terms that make up a fraction and how to reduce a fraction to its lowest terms. In addition, this module describes how to perform mathematical operations using fractions, including addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division.
  • Decimals and Percentages
    • This module provides an overview of mathematical functions using decimals and percentages, including the definition of decimals and percentages and an explanation of how they are used in an industrial setting. This module also explains how to convert fractions to decimals and decimals to fractions.
  • Exponents and Scientific Notation
    • This module introduces mathematical functions using exponents and scientific notation, including a discussion of exponents, factors, radicals, and square roots. This module also explains how to identify numbers written in scientific notation. In addition, the module describes how to perform mathematical operations using exponential numbers, including addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division.
  • Fundamentals of Algebra I
    • The Algebra I module introduces the basic functions of algebra in an industrial setting. Topics covered in this module include basic algebraic terms, including constants, variables, coefficients, and expressions, as well as how to perform mathematical operations using algebraic expressions, including addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division.
  • Fundamentals of Algebra II
    • This module builds upon Algebra I and explains algebraic equations and how they may be applied in an industrial setting. Topics covered in the Algebra II module include an overview of the four axioms used for solving algebraic expressions and the methods by which the axioms are used. In addition, this module explains how to solve an algebraic equation with unknown quantities and the relationship between ratios and proportions.
  • Fundamentals of Geometry I
    • This module provides an introduction to basic geometry and its uses in the maintenance field. The topics included in this module include the types of angles and their measurements, common terms in plane geometry, and formulas for calculating the perimeter area of triangles, squares, and rectangles.
  • Fundamentals of Geometry II
    • This module builds on Fundamentals of Geometry I to provide the knowledge and mathematical tools to understand circles and other geometric figures. Topics covered in this module include the common parts of a circle and how to calculate the circumference, as well as the formulas for calculating the surface area and volume of three-dimensional shapes.
  • Fundamentals of Trigonometry
    • This module explains the fundamental principles of trigonometry and its uses in the maintenance field. The module provides an overview of the Pythagorean Theorem, the sine, cosine, and tangent functions, and trigonometric identities.
  • Scientific Calculator Use
    • This module introduces the basic functions of a scientific calculator. The topics in the module include how to perform basic mathematical operations, such as addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division, as well as order of operations. The Scientific Calculator Use module also explains how to calculate percentages and square roots and how to enter numbers in scientific notations. In addition, this module describes how to use the trigonometric function of a scientific calculator.
  • Fundamentals of Statistics I
    • This module provides an overview of statistics, which is the study of the collection, organization, and interpretation of data. The topics covered in this module include how to read tables and graphs, the difference between mean, median, and mode, and the normal distribution curve.
  • Fundamentals of Statistics II
    • This module expands on Fundamentals of Statistics I to provide the tools necessary to understand more complex statistical operations and functions. The module provides an overview of standard deviation, how to analyze a distribution curve, the rules of probability, and industrial applications of statistical analysis.
  • Introduction to Calculus
    • Calculus has widespread applications in science, engineering, and economics and can solve many problems for which algebra alone is insufficient. This module introduces the industrial uses of calculus, such as calculating production rate and rate of delivery, and covers topics including derivatives and integrals.

Tools

  • Hand Tools I
    • The Hand Tools I module introduces some of the basic concepts related to hand tools and hand tool safety. This module provides an overview of the importance of hand tool safety and the basic functions and types of hammers, punches, prying tools, screwdrivers, and wrenches.
  • Hand Tools II
    • Building on the Hand Tools I module, this module introduces the basic functions and types of additional hand tools. Topics covered include cutting tools, such as crosscut and rip saws, knives, cutting blades, files, and chisels, gripping and holding tools, such as pliers and clamps, and measuring tools.
  • Power Tools
    • This module introduces the basic concepts related to power tools and power tool safety procedures and precautions, including the necessary knowledge to select the proper power tool for a given task and how to care for power tools and equipment.

Maintenance

  • Preventive Maintenance
    • This module discusses the importance of preventive maintenance and how it aids in prolonging the life and increasing the reliability of equipment, instrumentation, and general facilities. This module provides an overview of the advantages and benefits of preventive maintenance, the difference between preventive and corrective maintenance, and computer maintenance management systems (CMMS).
  • Predictive Maintenance
    • This module discusses the importance and implementation of a predictive maintenance program to predict possible component failure in order to reduce equipment breakdown. The module introduces the various tools and techniques used in a predictive maintenance program, including infrared, corona detection, vibration analysis, oil analysis, and trend analysis, as well as explains the benefits of thermography and vibration analysis.
  • Basic Troubleshooting
    • This module provides an overview of basic troubleshooting concepts. The topics covered in this module include identifying troubleshooting resources, understanding normal system operations, and diagnosing a problem using the half-split method. In addition, the module introduces the components of a troubleshooting flowchart.

Environment

  • Environmental Awareness
    • The Environmental Awareness module discusses the impact of environmental issues on industry. This module provides an overview of environmental, health, and safety regulations established by law, such as OSHA and EPA regulations; priority pollutants, such as noise, water, air, and hazardous waste; and actions to take to minimize pollution.
  • Hazardous Materials
    • This module identifies common industrial hazardous materials as determined by regulating agencies such as the EPA and OSHA, describes the handling and disposal of hazardous materials, and introduces related safety precautions and regulations.

Computers

  • Computer Use Basics
    • This module provides an overview of basic computer concepts. The topics covered in this module include basic computer components, file management and naming conventions, and networking concepts.
  • Computers in Industry
    • This module introduces typical computer use in industry. The module provides an overview of both residential and industrial computer systems, equipment control and monitoring systems, and portable peripheral devices, including both those that interface with equipment or a process and those that are used for recording information.

Print Reading

  • Print Reading Basics
    • This module discusses the basics of print reading. Topics covered common industrial prints, such as schematics, P&IDs, blueprints, block diagrams, and construction plans; the importance of blueprints and schematics; the proper use of legends; the purpose of title blocks and revisions; and block diagrams.
  • Piping and Instrumentation Diagrams
    • This module introduces the use of piping and instrumentation diagrams, as well as provides an explanation of how to read them. In addition, the module presents symbols, legends, and part lists that are used to read piping and instrumentation diagrams.

Science

  • Introduction to Chemistry
    • This module provides a basic introduction to chemistry. Topics covered in this module include fundamental concepts of chemistry, such as chemical symbols and the period table; mixtures, solutions, and compounds, including examples of mixtures found around the home as well as those used in industry; and the properties of chemicals. In addition, the module identifies methods of chemical analysis.
  • Water Chemistry
    • The Water Chemistry module discusses the chemical properties of water as well as its use in plant operation and maintenance. The module provides an overview of the properties of water, including whether or not water is potable; the types, sources, and effects of impurities in water, including water treatment systems; methods used to obtain water samples; parameters monitored by the water monitoring station; and the principles of water treatment, including wastewater and boiler feedwater treatment.
  • Applied Physics I - Work, Energy and Power
    • This module introduces the terms work, energy, and power and explains the difference between potential and kinetic energy. Topics covered include the relationship between work, energy, and power; the basic types of energy, including chemical, mechanical, nuclear, gravitational, radiant, thermal, motion, sound, and electrical; the difference between potential and kinetic energy; the principles of levers and inclined planes; the operation of simple machines, including levers, pulleys, wheels and axles, and inclined planes.
  • Applied Physics II - Laws of Motion
    • This module explains the terms, characteristics, and basic concepts of various physical processes. Topics covered include English and System International (SI) metric units for mass, length, and derived units; the proper use of conversion tables; the definition of force, including gravitational force, electromagnetic force, nuclear force, normal force, friction, elasticity, deformation, and torque; mass; velocity; and acceleration. This module will also describe the laws of motion and the relationship between force, mass, velocity, and acceleration.
  • Applied Physics III - Heat Transfer
    • This module explains the principles of heat transfer, which concerns the exchange of thermal energy from one medium to another. Topics covered include the difference between heat and temperature, including the package boiler, temperature gauge, and associated piping; how to perform temperature calculations based on the Fahrenheit and Celsius temperature scales; specific heat, including the phase changes of water; and the three modes of heat transfer: convection, conduction, and radiant.
  • Applied Physics IV - Fluid Mechanics
    • This module explains the principles of fluid mechanics, which deals with fluid flow — the natural science of fluids in motion. Harnessing the power of fluids, such as air, oil, and water, is fundamental to any industrial facility. Topics covered include the states of matter and how density is related to a state of matter; Pascal’s law for fluid power; the relationship between pressure, force, and area; and the relationship between fluid flow and the area of a pipe, including an explanation of Bernoulli’s equation.
  • Applied Physics V - Ideal Gas Law
    • The Ideal Gas Law module continues to explain the principles of fluid dynamics. The topics covered in this module include the use of gases such as air, natural gas, and carbon dioxide in an industrial facility, as well as the Ideal Gas law and how to use it to calculate pressure changes.
  • Applied Physics VI - Thermodynamics
    • This module introduces industrial applications of thermodynamics. Topics covered include the four laws of thermodynamics, including concepts such as thermal equilibrium, conservation of energy, entropy, and temperatures of absolute zero.

Industrial Hydraulic Fundamentals

  • Hydraulic Theory
    • Originally, the science of hydraulics covered the physical behavior of water at rest and in motion. The term has broadened its meaning to include the physical behavior of all liquids. This includes that area of hydraulics in which confined liquids are used under controlled pressure to do work. This area of hydraulics is sometimes referred to as power hydraulics. In order to safely and correctly operate a power hydraulic system, it is necessary to understand how the fluid behaves and why it behaves the way it does.
  • Hydraulic Components I
    • The use of hydraulics to transmit power has reached almost every facet of the industrial world. These hydraulic systems are composed of the hydraulic fluid itself, pipes and tubes used to transport the fluid, and components that perform a variety of functions. In order to understand how a hydraulic system works, it is important to understand the functions of the various components and how they operate.
  • Hydraulic Components II
    • The use of hydraulics to transmit power has reached almost every facet of the industrial world. These hydraulic systems are composed of the hydraulic fluid itself, pipes and tubes used to transport the fluid, and components that perform a variety of functions. In order to understand how a hydraulic system works on the whole, it is important to understand the functions of the various components and how they operate.
  • Hydraulic Systems
    • The use of hydraulics to transmit power has reached almost every facet of the industrial world. With an understanding of hydraulic theory and the various types of hydraulic components, it is possible to understand the designs and functions of an entire hydraulic system. Knowledge of how these systems operate and the ability to read system schematics are crucial to the proper operation and maintenance of any hydraulic system.

Industrial Pneumatic Fundamentals

  • Pneumatic Theory I
    • Pneumatic systems, like hydraulic power systems, are classified as fluid power systems. The term hydraulics refers to a liquid used as the fluid, while the term pneumatic specifies a system that uses a compressed gas as the fluid. The gas most commonly used is compressed air, although some applications may use other gases, such as nitrogen or carbon dioxide.
  • Pneumatic Theory II
    • The use of pneumatics has become a large part of industrial operations and maintenance. Pneumatic systems and tools reduce required work, reduce time required, and increase efficiency over manual operations. This module explains how these things are accomplished.
  • Pneumatic Components I
    • Modern uses of pneumatics include the use of compressed air to move objects through pneumatic tubes, the control of industrial processes through air logic control, and the operation of various tools and equipment. While pneumatic systems can be used to perform a wide array of functions, the same types of components are used in any system dealing with pressurized air. In order to understand how a pneumatic system works on the whole, it is important to understand the functions of the various components and how they operate.
  • Pneumatic Components II
    • Modern uses of pneumatic components include the use of compressed air to move objects through pneumatic tubes, the control of industrial processes through air logic control, and the operation of various tools and equipment. While pneumatic systems can be used to perform a wide array of functions, the same types of components are used in any system dealing with pressurized air. In order to understand how a pneumatic system works on the whole, it is important to understand the function and operation of the various components.
  • Pneumatic Systems
    • Pneumatic systems serve a variety of uses in the industrial world. They range from simple stand-alone systems used to power pneumatic tools, to complex systems used to automatically control intricate processes. Safe and efficient operation is dependent upon the operator’s ability to read the schematics for these systems and understand how the components work together.

Precision Measurement Instruments

  • Precision Measuring Instruments
    • “Measure twice, cut once,” is a phrase that is often heard in the working world. This phrase simply means that if the measurement is not correct, the cut will not matter. To minimize the chance of a “bad cut”, the development of precision measuring instruments came about. These tools provide a very precise measurement to allow a reading in the thousandths of an inch or millimeter. Precision measuring tools can be used for detailed measurements of inside diameter, outside diameter, roundness, surface finish, lengths, and depths.
  • Micrometers
    • In this module you will learn about several different types of micrometers, what each of them should be used for, and how to properly use them. You will also learn how to read a micrometer and techniques to prevent mistakes when taking measurements.
  • Vernier Calipers
    • The modern vernier caliper, which reads to thousandths of an inch, was invented by American Joseph R Brown in 1851. It was the first precision measurement tool that was priced reasonably enough for most machinists. The ability to make precise measurements was instrumental in producing modern interchangeable parts.
  • Dial Indicators
    • In the modern age of precision, the ability to measure any difference from the standard measurement is essential to ensure equipment longevity and accuracy. There is also a need for exact measurements of lash or play in equipment components to prevent binding. The dial indicator provides the ability to measure both of these variances as well as many others.
  • Fixed Gauges
    • Many different types of measuring devices are used for dimensional inspection. The primary factors involved in selecting the best device are the type of dimension to be measured, the tolerance of the dimension, and the characteristics of the measuring device. This module describes several types of fixed gages with particular attention given to their application.

Pumps

  • Pump Design
    • Pumps have been used to enhance life since 2,000 BC with the creation of the shadoof by the Egyptians. Since that point in time, there have been many advances, both in design and purpose. Pumps can be used to move solids, liquids, and gases from one place to another. They also can be used to raise the pressure in a system for hydraulic operations. Today, most pumps are classified as centrifugal or positive displacement pumps. To adequately understand and use each pump, it is important to first understand the purpose, design, and common terms associated with pumps.
  • Centrifugal Pumps
    • Pumps have been used to enhance life since 2,000 BC with the creation of the shadoof by the Egyptians. Since that point in time, there have been many advances: both in design and purpose. Pumps can be used to move solids, liquids, and gases from one place to another. They also can be used to raise pressure in a system for hydraulic operations. Today, most pumps are classified as centrifugal or positive displacement pumps. This module will focus on centrifugal pumps.
  • Positive Displacement Pumps
    • Pumps have been used to enhance life since 2,000 BC with the creation of the shadoof by the Egyptians. Since that point in time, there have been many advances, both in design and purpose. Pumps can be used to move solids, liquids, and gases from one place to another. They also can be used to raise pressure in a system for hydraulic operations. Today, most pumps are classified as centrifugal or positive displacement pumps. This module will explain the operation and types of positive displacement pumps.
  • Special-Purpose Pumps
    • Pumps have been used to enhance life since 2,000 BC with the creation of the shadoof by the Egyptians. Since that point in time, there have been many advances, both in design and purpose. Pumps can be used to move solids, liquids, and gases from one place to another. They also can be used to raise pressure in a system for hydraulic operations. Today, most pumps are classified as centrifugal or positive displacement pumps. To adequately understand and use each pump, it is important to first understand the purpose and design of the pump. This module will focus on special purpose pumps.
  • Pump Maintenance
    • Pumps have been used to enhance life since 2,000 BC with the creation of the shadoof by the Egyptians. Since that point in time, there have been many advances, both in design and purpose. Pumps can be used to move solids, liquids, and gases from one place to another. They also can be used to raise pressure in a system for hydraulic operations. Today, most pumps are classified as centrifugal or positive displacement pumps. To adequately understand and use each pump, it is important to understand the maintenance requirements of the pump.
  • Mechanical Seals
    • In the modern age, leakage from equipment has become unacceptable, no matter if the liquid is water or harmful chemicals. Fortunately, mechanical seals provide a sealing method around the rotating shafts, at the location where they exit housings. This allows for a safe and clean operation in today’s safety- and environmentally-minded world.

Static and Dynamic Sealing

  • Packing
    • Many systems found in industrial environments contain gases and liquids at high temperatures or pressures, or fluids that are otherwise inherently dangerous, such as ammonia. Within these systems are components that break the boundaries of the system with moving parts, like the stem of a valve or the shaft of a pump. In order to prevent the fluid within these systems from escaping to the atmosphere, packing is installed that can seal the component yet still allow relative motion between its parts. It is important to understand how this packing works, how it is installed, and what must be done to maintain it in a proper working condition.
  • Gaskets
    • Gaskets are widely used throughout industry to prevent leakage between stationary surfaces. Gasket replacement is an important maintenance job that saves money and down time. Therefore it is important for industry personnel to learn about the types of gaskets, as well as how to safely cut, replace, and install gaskets.
  • Bolted Joints I
    • Two common concerns in industrial facilities are leaking joints and vibrating equipment. These problems lead to excessive repair costs every year. This module explains the importance of proper torque for a bolted joint and the stresses that can affect the joint.
  • Bolted Joints II
    • There are many methods in place to attempt to prevent a mechanical joint from loosening. Some methods start at the initial design of the bolted joint with the selection of the flange surface finish and face design. Another important part of the bolted joint is the selection and use of the bolts or stud bolts.
  • Threaded Fasteners
    • Since their mass production and standardization became possible in the late 18th century, threaded fasteners have played a large role in industry. The strength, versatility, ubiquity, and low cost of threaded fasteners has resulted in their use in everything from structural supports for buildings to the bolts used to mount a motor to its base. While relatively simple in design and construction, selecting the proper fastener can be a very important choice. Many industrial disasters and fatalities have been attributed to a poorly chosen or defective fastener.
  • Torque and Tension
    • When is a fastener tight? The complete answer relies on the understanding of torque and tension, and how they are applied to bolts and threaded fasteners.

Valve Fundamentals

  • Basic Types and Operations I
    • In this module, several types of these valves and their common components will be briefly discussed, as well as the proper mounting and installation guidelines.
  • Basic Types and Operations II
    • Isolation or insufficient flow can result in instantaneous overpressurization and/or explosions; therefore, the proper positioning of isolation and throttle valves is crucial to the safe operation of any system. Gate, globe, needle, and butterfly valves are all used to stop, start, and throttle flow.
  • Basic Types and Operations III
    • Flow reversals and improper flow rates can lead to equipment failure and destruction. By understanding valve operations and ensuring proper valve orientation, these situations can be avoided. Ball valves and plug valves are used to stop, start, and throttle flow, while the check valve is used to prevent flow reversal, and the regulating valve is used to automatically adjust flow.
  • Relief and Safety Valves I
    • Many industrial facilities use pressurized liquids and gases in systems to perform functions, such as tool and instrument operation, energy production, and heating and cooling. All systems, regardless of how well they were engineered or the quality of the materials used, will have a maximum pressure they can withstand before a failure occurs. A system that fails in this manner can result in production downtime, destruction of expensive equipment, and even loss of life. One method used to prevent such a failure is the installation of automatic pressure relieving devices. Two such devices, relief valves and safety valves, are used to automatically relieve overpressure conditions in systems.
  • Relief and Safety Valves II
    • Industrial facilities use piping systems and tanks to transport and store water, steam, and gases at various temperatures and pressures. Although the pressures in these systems are carefully monitored and adjusted, operator error or an equipment malfunction can result in a loss of pressure control. If pressure is allowed to increase or decrease beyond the tolerances of the system containing the fluid, a catastrophic failure can occur. Relief and safety valves are used to prevent this from occurring, thereby avoiding equipment damage and personnel injury.
  • Actuators
    • A single facility can have hundreds, if not thousands, of valves to control everything from turbine operation to ventilation, to systems that ensure the safety of personnel and equipment. The valves used can range in size from less than an inch to several feet in diameter. While some of these valves are designed to be operated manually, many of them require some form of automatic or remote operation. Operators and technicians must understand the different types of actuators used to operate these valves, and how these actuators work.

Pipes and Pipe Fitting

  • Piping & Tubing
    • Piping and tubing are essential to the operation of nearly all industrial equipment, and are also found extensively throughout the home. From the pipes transporting 2000 psi steam in a power plant to the tubing carrying the hot water from a hot water heater to the bathtub, all piping and tubing is standardized and regulated for safety.
  • Piping Materials and Manufacturing Methods
    • This module will introduce you to piping materials and manufacturing methods. Topics included in this module are piping materials criteria, mechanical and physical properties of metal, and pipe manufacturing methods.
  • Pipe Insulation
    • Controlling heat loss in a piping system is essential to maximize thermal efficiency. The proper selection of materials during design will ensure the system operates within specifications with minimum heat loss to the environment. Insulation also provides for a more temperate work environment while also protecting workers from hot piping.
  • Pipe Hangers and Supports
    • As engineers plan piping systems, the support structure for these systems is designed as well. The use of pipe hangers and supports is crucial to prevent unnecessary stress on piping, while still allowing necessary movement. Properly supporting piping and piping components will extend their lifespan, by eliminating or reducing the stress on component housings.
  • Codes and Standards
    • As technology has progressed, the pressures and temperatures of liquids in piping systems have drastically increased. These pressurized liquids are capable of containing enormous amounts of stored energy, and therefore the piping carrying them needs to be regulated to ensure the personnel safety. Piping codes and standards are the first line in protecting people from these dangers, but the attention to detail and quality checks of the personnel constructing and operating these systems are crucial to safe operation.

Lubrication Concepts

  • Principles of Lubrication
    • When any two objects are in contact, at least one type of force is acting on the contact point, friction. Friction can cause wearing of material and generate heat. To minimize the effects of friction, a lubricant is used to partially separate the two objects.
  • Preventing Wear and Erosion
    • Mechanical equipment is designed to last a lifetime, in an ideal situation. As equipment is used, friction, heat, and system flow will cause wear and erosion to occur. A lubricant is used to prevent excessive damage.
  • Bearing System Lubrication
    • Proper lubrication is a key factor affecting a bearing’s performance and longevity. Just as there are many different types of applications in which bearings are used, there are many ways of providing lubrication based on the application. In order to maintain and work on these systems, a technician must have an understanding of the various methods used.
  • Lubricant Properties
    • Whenever an object moves against another object, friction will be present, turning kinetic energy into heat and causing equipment to wear. Using lubricants helps to reduce this friction, allowing more work to be done for the same amount of energy input, lowering the temperatures of the materials in contact, and greatly extending the lifespan of the moving equipment.
  • Machinery Lubrication
    • From temperatures of over 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit to speeds in the tens of thousands of revolutions per minute, the moving parts of industrial machinery experience colossal amounts of stress as part of their everyday operation. One of the main factors that allows equipment to operate under such extreme circumstances is the lubrication used to reduce friction between moving surfaces. Understanding the types, selection, and care of the lubrication found in an industrial facility is vital knowledge for operators and technicians.

Bearing Maintenance

  • Bearing Fundamentals
    • All rotating equipment creates radial and axial forces during normal operation. These forces can lead to catastrophic failure of the equipment unless the proper support equipment and systems are used. The most critical is the selection of bearings and lubrication systems.
  • Rolling Contact Bearings I
    • Rolling bearings are used in almost every object, from bicycles to power generation equipment. There are many rolling bearing designs, but each is constructed to reduce rolling friction with the aid of proper lubrication techniques.
  • Rolling Contact Bearings II
    • Normal maintenance of rolling contact bearings includes ensuring proper installation and lubrication methods are used. During the removal process of a bearing, the reason for a bearing failure can be analyzed and identified.
  • Sliding Surface Bearings
    • Rotating equipment, like large motors and generators, produce large amounts of force. These forces can be in a radial or axial direction to that of the shaft. A common means to support and counter these forces is through the use of journal and thrust bearings.

Mechanical Transmission Systems

  • Gear Drives
    • Gear drives and gearboxes are an essential part of equipment operation. Understanding the components, terminology, and the variety of characteristics of gears and transmission assemblies is crucial to the effective and efficient operation of these devices.
  • Gearbox Maintenance
    • Gearboxes and reduction drives are essential components of the industrial world. They allow the use of smaller motors to drive larger equipment, and the ability to slow the drive speed of a motor down to a number of useful speeds that are needed for equipment operation. The proper maintenance of these gearboxes is essential to their longevity and efficiency.
  • Belt Drives I
    • Belt drives are used to transmit power from a pulley to one or more other pulleys, and are popular due there cost effectiveness and relative simplicity. They are used in a multitude of applications, such as: Automotive engine accessory drives Air compressors Vacuum cleaner brush drives Riding lawn mower blade drives
  • Belt Drives II
    • There are many types of belts that are used in both industrial and commercial applications. One widely used design is the V-belt, which is commonly found in high performance engines.
  • Belt Drives III
    • Variable speed drives allow a single motor to drive multiple loads at different speeds. This simple design reduces the number of drives required and, therefore, maximizes available space.
  • Belt Drives IV
    • Belt drives are used in industrial equipment to reduce noise levels and equipment vibrations. There are several designs that are used for specific purposes.
  • Belt Drives Maintenance
    • Maintaining a belt drive in proper working condition will maximize the life of the belts, bushings, bearings, and sheaves. In this module, the common maintenance checks will be discussed.
  • Chain Drives I
    • In an industrial facility, motors and turbines use energy to produce rotational mechanical motion. In order to harness this motion to perform useful work, there must be a way to transmit it to other components and machines. One method of power transmission is through the use of chain drives and sprockets.
  • Chain Drives II
    • In an industrial facility, motors and turbines use energy to produce rotational mechanical motion. In order to harness this motion to perform useful work, there must be a way to transmit it to other components and machines. One method of power transmission is through the use of chain drives and sprockets.

Rigging

  • Basic Rigging
    • In industry, the term "rigging" defines the process of moving heavy loads with ropes, hoists, and other types of specially designed tools. The term is also used to define the equipment used to lift the load. Rigging jobs consist of anything from routine lifting maneuvers to complex movements of heavy equipment and components. Regardless of the size of the job, the basic equipment and procedures are essentially the same.
  • Advanced Rigging I
    • Lifting heavy loads with cranes can be hazardous if not done right. Learn types of cranes and inspection procedures in this course.
  • Advanced Rigging II
    • Lifting heavy loads with cranes can be hazardous if not done right. Learn lifting procedures for bridge and boom cranes in this course.

Shaft Alignment

  • Types and Effects of Shaft Misalignment
    • Shaft couplings are used extensively throughout industry on a variety of equipment to ensure the proper connection between equipment components. Proper connection and flexibility is vital to long machinery life. In this module, participants are introduced to the basics of the alignment process as well as the causes, indications, and effects of misalignment.
  • Alignment Tools and Methods
    • The purpose of the Alignment Tools and Methods module is to familiarize technicians with the most common alignment methods used today. As with any method, there are potential sources of error, as well as advantages. This module points out some of the more important aspects for each method and covers visual line-up, straightedge and feeler gauge, rim and face, cross dial, reverse dial, and laser shaft alignment methods. In addition, participants learn about alignment preparation and the pre-alignment checklist.
  • Soft Foot and Bar Sag
    • Soft foot is defined as a condition where the machine’s feet do not lie in the same plane as the base. Machine frame distortion is the result of changes that occur internally or externally to the frame of the machine. This often causes a shaft deflection or movement as the hold-down bolt is tightened when a soft foot condition exists. Another common problem is indicator sag, which is the effect of gravity on a fixture. This module teaches participants to detect and correct soft foot and bar sag.
  • Moving the Machine
    • Moving a machine can be the most difficult step in the entire alignment process. Alignment correction is physically moving the piece of machinery the amount prescribed by the calculations. Because the process of moving a piece of equipment is time-consuming, it is necessary that the move is based on good data calculations. This module teaches participants how to accurately perform the three stages of the alignment process.
  • Rim and Face Alignment
    • The rim and face alignment method is one of the most common alignment techniques used in industry. This method is usually used when laser alignment equipment is not available for use. This module teaches participants about the proper techniques for performing rim and face alignments.
  • Cross and Reverse Dial Alignment
    • The mathematical formula for calculating adjustments to properly align a shaft using the reverse double dial indicator alignment method follows a basic rise over run geometric principle. By following this principle, the alignment of machinery can be easily accomplished using the formulas. This module teaches participants how to accurately calculate and perform the cross and reverse dial alignments.
  • Laser Alignment
    • This module introduces laser alignment tools and their use to measure shaft misalignment.

Welding Fundamentals

  • Introduction to Welding
    • This module will introduce you to welding and welding processes. Welding is a common process for joining metals using a large variety of applications. Welding occurs in several locations, from outdoors on rural farms and construction sites to inside factories and job shops. Welding processes are fairly simple to understand, and basic techniques can be learned quickly.
  • General Welding Safety
    • This module will introduce you to general welding safety. Topics included in this module are hazards associate with welding, proper PPE, and additional equipment to safely weld.
  • Shielded Metal Arc Welding
    • This module will introduce you to shielded metal arc welding, or SMAW. SMAW is the most commonly used welding method, often used for repair jobs on farms, construction sites, and industrial equipment sites. This process is also preferred for outdoor welding.
  • Gas Tungsten Arc Welding
    • This module will introduce you to gas tungsten arc welding, or GTAW. GTAW was developed to produce high quality welds on a variety of metals. GTAW requires the welder to be more skilled than other welding processes and is used in a number of work environments.
  • Gas Metal Arc Welding
    • This module will introduce you to gas metal arc welding, or GMAW. GMAW is the most popular method of welding due to its adaptability in various industries. This type is commonly used for sheet metal work and utilizes a continuous wire feed to complete welds.
  • Oxyacetylene Welding and Cutting
    • This module will introduce you to the oxyacetylene welding (OAW) and cutting process. OAW is one of the easiest forms of welding to learn and the equipment is low cost. Oxyacetylene cutting is also just as easy to learn and provides a means to cut through very thick materials. OAW and oxyacetylene cutting can be found in a number of environments including shops, construction sites, and salvage yards.
  • Brazing
    • This module will introduce you to brazing. Brazing provides a means to combine different materials without affecting the composition of the materials. Brazing works with temperatures above 800ºF and creates bonds as strong as welded materials.
  • Weld Joint Inspection
    • This module will introduce you to the importance of quality welds and processes involved in analyzing welds. Topics included in this module are the effects of poor welds, causes of poor welds, and nondestructive and destructive testing methods used on welds.
$270.00