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SORTERS

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Sortation Theory

One of the most important areas of any facility is the sortation area. Sorters can be used for shipping, replenishment, or as part of another activity. In this section, we'll look at how a sorter operates and what you can do to maintain its performance.

Menu
1.1.2 Gapping
1.1.3 Tracking
7.12.1.1 PLC Errors
10.5.1 Schematics
10.5.2.2 I/O Wiring

Induction

The first part of the sortation process is induction. Induction is the introduction of product into the sortation system in a controlled and predetermined manner. Induction allows the system to accept product at high-speeds and in a uniform way. This is also where the system begins to track the product through the sortation process.

Induction is broken into three parts:

  • Accumulation
  • Gapping
  • Tracking

Accumulation

Prior to the first belt of the sorter is a section of conveyor where product will accumulate. Accumulation conveyors are used to bring a steady flow of product to the sorter, allowing the system to run at high-speeds continuously. This provides higher throughput rates and is a more efficient way to operate the equipment.

Gapping

Gapping is the process of putting space between the accumulated packages. Gapping is a very important part of the sortation process as it allows the system to identify each individual package as the package makes its way through the system. Without the proper amount of space between each package, the system would view multiple packages as a single large package.


Figure 1

Product is gapped through a series of metering belts. Each of these belts runs at a faster speed than the previous belt, pulling the package ahead of the preceding package and placing a gap between the packages. The size of the gap depends on the size of the packages and the ratio of the speeds of the metering belts.


Figure 2

Gapping in this manner is called mechanical gapping.

Gapping also lets the system measure boxes as they move down the conveyor. Using the Gap photoeye and a Pulse Position Indicator (PPI), the length of a box can be measured within 1/2 of an inch of its actual length. A PPI is a counting device that is linked to a belt and the RSCC. For every 1/2" of belt travel, the PPI rotates a set amount, generating pulses, or ticks. By counting the number of ticks from the PPI when the beam from the Gap photoeye is broken until the beam is complete again, the RSCC can calculate the length of the box.

Using the same technique, the RSCC can also measure the length of the gap between the trailing edge of one box and the leading edge of another box.


Figure 3

Tracking

Tracking is an essential part of the sortation process. All packages are tracked on the sorter using a Moving Update Zone (MUZ). A MUZ is a "window" in which the package can be expected to appear at a certain point. This window is measured by the sorter in PPI ticks. Since a PPI tick is 1/2" of belt travel, the windows size can be calculated.


Figure 4

The MUZ window is built as the package arrives at the Package Present photoeye. The system tracks the MUZ by calculating, based on the number of PPI ticks to the next photoeye, the time it should take the package to arrive at the next photoeye. The package can actually arrive at any point within the MUZ window and still be accurately tracked. If the packages leading edge is outside of the MUZ window at any point, the RSCC generates an error and the package is recirculated.

Each time a package is "seen" by the RSCC, its position is updated to reflect its actual position and the calculation for when it should be seen again is updated. This allows for minor shifting of the package on the sorter.

The size of the MUZ window and the time the RSCC will wait to see packages are adjustable through the field parameters.

Scanning

Once the packages have been gapped, the packages pass through the overhead scanner. The overhead scanner reads the barcode on the top of the packages and relays the information to the RSCC. The RSCC attaches this information to the MUZ window information for the scanned package when the package reaches the first Update photoeye. This information is used by the RSCC to determine where to divert the carton onto a shipping lane. If a carton reaches the Update photoeye without a bar code being received from the scanner, the RSCC generates a "No Code" error and the carton is directed to the divert assigned in the Factory/Field parameters for "No Code" cartons.


Figure 5

Translation

All the information attached to the MUZ has to be associated with a code known to the RSCC in order for the package to be properly diverted. To get this code, a process called translation takes place. During a translation, the RSCC matches information about the package taken from the bar code, such as store number and group assignments, with a divert number.

With this information, the RSCC determines the divert that the package needs to be diverted to, and determines when to fire a diverter.

Diverting of Package

Diverting a package means that the package is pushed off the sorter and down a divert lane. The divert process is triggered by a diverter, a device on the side of the sorter that releases a charge when the package is supposed to be in position to be diverted. The package position is determined by the MUZ window, and where the RSCC has calculated that the MUZ window is on the sorter. It is at this point where the portion diverter process pushes the package with what is known as a shoe in some configurations.


Figure 6

The RSCC fires enough shoes on the sorter to cover the length of the package plus an extra shoe or two to allow for the package shifting. To make sure that the package was diverted, the RSCC calculates the time that the package would arrive at the next update photoeye. If the calculated time passes without a signal from the next update photoeye, the RSCC assumes that the package has been properly diverted.

Reporting Successfully Diverted Cartons

The RSCC records all package diverts by assembling a package of information in its memory. This information can include:

  • Bar code information
  • Length of package
  • Intended divert number
  • Whether the divert was successful
  • Time and date information

This information is sent to the Host computer when either a certain number of packets are assembled or a specified time period has elapsed.

Field Factory Sheets Example

Factory/Field Parameter sheets store site-specific information about the configuration of the RSCC. Any time you make changes to any parameter of the RSCC, you should note the change in the Factory/Field sheets. If the settings are lost for any reason, you can recover them from the Factory/Field sheets. The following pages have example pages of a Field/Factory sheets. The Factory/Field sheets for your location may be different.


Figure 7


Figure 8


Figure 9


Figure 10


Figure 11


Figure 12


Figure 13

RSCC Controls

Basics of Operation

The RapidSortControllerConventional (RSCC) controls the induction, spacing, tracking, and diverting of cartons from a sorting conveyor. As cartons travel across the induction conveyors, they are separated mechanically by belts. This gap is measured by the RSCC using photoeyes and Pulse Position Indicators (PPI).

The gap is further adjusted toward a predetermined gap by changing the speed of servo controlled induction belts just before the carton is transferred onto fixed speed induction belts. The cartons are then merged together on a Wide Merge conveyor before being conveyed onto the sorter conveyor. As cartons begin the induction process and are transferred onto the sorter, their position is tracked in the RSCC. To allow for some carton slippage, the cartons' positions are checked and updated in the tracking program at intervals along the length of the sorter using update photoeyes and PPIs. Cartons inducted onto the sorter are scanned by a bar code scanner. The label contains certain information which, when read by the scanner, is transmitted to the RSCC. The RSCC uses this information to determine which Diverter to operate to correctly sort the carton onto a shipping lane. An update photoeye located after the scanner is designated as the Scan After Merge (SAM) update and is used by the RSCC to attach the divert information to the appropriate carton. As each carton approaches a divert point, the RSCC checks the divert information and determines whether to actuate (or "fire") the divert to steer the carton off the sorter and onto the shipping lane.

Field-mounted Devices

  • Photoeyes
  • PPIs
  • Divert actuators
  • Operator interface station VDT.

Cabinet-mounted Devices

  • Power supplies
  • Input modules
  • Output modules
  • Mounting bases for the Input and Output modules
  • Specialized electronic boards for processing Input and Output signals
  • Micro computer (CPU)
  • Boards for communicating serially with various equipment
  • Card rack for containing these boards
  • Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS)

PPI Settings

The PPI DIP switch settings must match Figure 14.


Figure 14: PPI DIP Switch Settings

Video Display Terminal

See the VDT tab in the equipment manual for more information on your VDT system.

Programmable Logic Controller

The Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) is a microcomputer based control device. It can be programmed using ladder logic, a symbolic programming language, which look similar to electrical schematics. PLCs can be used to replace hardware devices such as relays, motor starters, solenoids, and timers.

Modicon PLCs communicate via a special network called MODBUS PLUS (MB+). A software package called CONCEPT is used for offline programming and to monitor or modify the program while it is running. The program can be saved to the PCs hard disk and can be downloaded to the PLC memory as required.

  • Online When you use Concept in the online mode, you can view and write data to the PLC in real-time. You can also transfer programs from the PLC to the laptop, or from the laptop to the PLC.
  • Offline When Concept is in the offline mode, you can view and modify code that is saved on the laptop.

PLC Hardware

PLC hardware consists of various components, which are consistent regardless of the model of PLC being used. These include a power supply, processor, racks, specialty modules, input modules, and output modules.

  • The power supply converts the 120VAC, available in the control cabinet, to the power required for the operation on the PLC.
  • The processor contains the program and makes logical decisions based on information it receives.
  • The rack is used to mount the PLC components into one common enclosure.
  • Specialty modules include power units and adapters that allow you to connect to the PLC network.
  • The input modules receive signals from the "real world" devices such as pushbuttons, photo-electric switches, etc. and converts these inputs into signals the processor can read.
  • The output modules are controlled by the processor based on the logical decisions made by the processor. Devices controlled by the output modules are motor starters, solenoids, lights, etc.

Other hardware items related to the PLC include remote I/O adapter modules, which connect the processor to remote cabinets that contain the remote I/O adapter. Each PLC on the MB+network is assigned a unique numerical address using switches on the PLC.The switch settings for each PLCs addressing are indicated on the drawings for the control cabinet containing the PLC.

When necessary, two or more networks can be interconnected through a device called a bridge. This device is also assigned a MB+address. If the device is replaced, the new bridge must be addressed by setting the addressing switches. Indicator lights on the bridge indicate when the device is functioning.

A personal computer (PC) equipped with a MB+network adapter card can also be attached to the MB+network. The Concept software package is used to monitor or program any PLC on the network from any location on the MB+network.

PLC Troubleshooting

To troubleshoot a PLC, follow the same methods you would if you were troubleshooting a piece of electrical equipment.

  • Eliminate external equipment such as power switches and photoeyes as possible sources of an issue first.
  • Work your way towards the PLC, checking each piece of equipment as you go. Remember that an issues source is not always the most obvious place where a symptom occurs.

If you work your way to the PLC during troubleshooting, it may be necessary to connect the laptop to the PLCs processor to help find the source of an issue. The program that is loaded on the laptop for monitoring the input and output devices will depend on what type of PLC you have.

Once the laptop is connected to the PLC, go online with the PLC programming software. While in online mode, you can monitor the input and output devices in the PLC program.

Common Conditions

If the PLC indicates a COMM ERROR, communication between the CPU and the remote location is interrupted. Check the remote I/O cable and its connector; a poor connection can cause communication problems.

If the PLC indicates an OURBUS ERROR, communication between the PLC and the remote location is interrupted, and the error is at the remote location.Check the communication cable at the remote location.

If the COMM ACTIVE lamp on the front of the module is off but the power is on, the module is probably defective. Before changing the module, check the remote I/O cable and its connector as a poor connection can cause communication problems.

The remote I/O interface module has a series of switches that designate the address for the module. It is critical to system operation that these switches be properly set. If you have communications problems involving the I/O interface module, check the switch settings.

A sample troubleshooting chart is shown in Figure 15.


Figure 15: Sample Troubleshooting Chart

Concept Software

Most procedures begin with starting the Concept software, opening a project and getting connected to the PLC.

Starting the Concept Software

1. To start Concept, double click the Concept Icon on the desktop.


Figure 16: Concept Icon

2. The main Concept window opens.


Figure 17: Main Concept Window

Opening a Project

1. Click the File menu and then select Open. The Open File dialog box opens as shown in Figure 18.


Figure 18: Open File Dialog Box

  • A project is a collection of source code files that are complied and downloaded to the PLC. The source code is also required to troubleshoot the system.
  • cb1.prj and cb2.prj are the clutch and brake controllers. These programs have been permanently loaded into PROMs in the Momentum PLCs.
  • Etf_auto.prj is also a Momentum PLC. Etf_pc1.prj and etf_pc2.prj are Quantum PLCs from Modicon. These three PLCs may have to have their programs downloaded.

2. Double-click the name of the correct project. The project file is opened.

  • The project name will be displayed in the title bar.

Getting Connected

1. Click Online, and then click Connect.


Figure 19: Online Menu

  • The Connect to PLC dialog box will appear.
  • The Protocol Type, PLC Address, and Access Level last used are stored in Concept as the default value. You may have to change them to make a connection. If you are unsure, select the Monitor only option.


Figure 20: Connect to PLC Dialog Box

2. Click OK. The program connects to the PLC.


Figure 21: Status Bar

  • The status bar will display the word RUNNING if the PLC is running or the word STOPPED if the PLC is not running.
  • To the right of the word RUNNING or STOPPED will be your access level.
  • EQUAL means that the source code you opened matches the compiled program in the PLC. If it says NOT EQUAL you may have to download the source code into the PLC.

Stopping or Starting a PLC

1. Click the Online menu.


Figure 22: Online Menu

2. Click Online control panel. The Online Control Panel dialog box opens.


Figure 23

3. To stop the controller, click the Stop controller button and then click Yes in the Confirm online operation dialog box to continue stopping the controller. To start the controller, click the Start controller button and then click Yes in the Confirm online operation dialog box to continue starting the controller.

  • The status bar will show the status of the PLC (Figure 24).


Figure 24: PLC Stopped Status

4. Click Close to close the Online control panel dialog box.

Monitoring the Ladder Logic

Make sure you are online with the PLC before following these steps.

  1. Click the File menu and then select Open section.


Figure 25: File Menu

2. The Open Section dialog box opens.


Figure 26: Open Section Dialog Box

The PLCs program is made up of many sections of diagrams. Each diagram is given a name that describes what part of the machine it controls or monitors. There are six styles of Logic Diagrams:

  • Function Block Diagrams (FBD)
  • Instruction List Diagrams (ILD)
  • Structured Text Diagrams (STD)
  • Ladder Diagrams (LD)
  • Sequential Flow Chart (SFC)
  • 984 Ladder Logic Diagrams

3. Click the diagram section thats description matches the part of the machine you want to monitor or troubleshoot. The logic diagram will open in the main window.


Figure 27: Logic Diagram

Forcing Inputs and Outputs

1. Click the Online menu and then select Reference Data Editor.


Figure 28: Online Menu

2. The Reference Data Editor (RDE) template opens and a Caution dialog box opens.

3. After reading the message, click OK to close the Caution dialog box.

4. In the Address column, enter the reference number of the I/O point to be forced.

  • Use a prefix of 1 for inputs and 0 for outputs


Figure 29: Reference Number for Point
5. The I/O points are displayed. Click the Disable button to the right of the I/O point to force that I/O.

  • The current status of the I/O point will not be grayed out.

6. Enter ON in the Value column to force the point on or OFF to force the point off.

Downloading a Project into the PLC

1.Click Online and then select Download. The Download Controller dialog box opens.


Figure 30: Online Menu

Figure 31: Download Controller Dialog Box
2. Click the ALL button to mark all the checkboxes on the Download Controller dialog box. The project is ready to be downloaded.

3. Click the Download button. The dialog box will display a message as the program is downloaded to the PLC. When the download is done, a dialog box will open asking if you want to start the controller.

4. Click Yes to start the PLC.

Searching

1. Select the type of programmed object for which you want to search.

2. Click the Search icon on the toolbar or press F3. The Search dialog box opens.


Figure 32: Search Dialog Box

  • All objects used in the project have been given variable names. Selecting different options in the Search dialog box will change the method of searching. For example, selecting the Variable option in the Search What section will search for variable names similar to the object listed in the Object Name field.
  • The checkboxes that are marked in the Search Where section determine where the program will search. For example, marking I/O Map will find where the object is assigned to an input or output card. The option you select in the Access Mode section determines what kind of access you will have to the search results.

3. Once you have selected the search options, click the Search button. Any results are displayed in the Search Results / History dialog box.


Figure 33: Search Results/ History Dialog Box

  • This Search Results / History dialog box shows that the PartSens2_Buffer variable has been used in five different ladder diagrams. From this dialog box, you can go directly to the place in the ladder logic where the object is.

4. Select the object to which you want to go in the Search Results / History dialog box.

5. Click the Goto button. The ladder diagram is opened to the objects position.


Figure 34: Object Position On Ladder Diagram

  • Each time a search is performed, the results are added to the search history.


Figure 35: Appended Search Results/ History Dialog Box
6. To empty the Search Results / History dialog box, click the Clear button.

  • Search Results will stay in this dialog box until you clear the dialog box by pressing the Clear button. You can open the Search Results / History dialog box to view a previous search by choosing Search History from the Project menu, or by pressing F5.

Menu Bar Icons


Figure 36: Toolbar Buttons


Figure 37: Tollbar Buttons 2

Modbus Communication Cable

To make a Modbus cable, follow the pin out shown in Figure 38.


Figure 38: Modbus Pin Out Diagram
The above cable is used to connect the Modbus port on the PLC to the com port of the portable computer. It is also called a Null Modem RS232 cable.

General Controller Stop Codes

The RUN light on all Modicon PLCs indicates that the PLC is currently running the loaded logic program and that all runtime diagnostics have passed. If an error occurs in the PLC, the PLC will stop scanning and all processing of I/O stops. The RUN light will turn off and an error code will be generated. This code can be viewed through the Concept software following the steps below.

  1. Click Online and then select Connect. A dialog box asking for communication parameters opens.
  2. Select Protocol type and Protocol settings. If you are using a Modbus Plus, you will also select the node you wish to attach to.
  3. Click OK. The top banner displays the node address you are attached to.
  4. Select Online and then select Controller status.
    • This will open screen 1 of the controller status table. Click the >>button to go to screen 5.
  5. The page will display 16 stop codes. Any bit that is set to 1 indicates that an error has occurred. This can be converted to hex or you can match the description with the descriptions listed in the following table.

Error

Description

Action

7FFFH

Controller Unhealthy

Remove the battery from the PLC and wait for about a minute. This should clear all memory and state RAM from the controller. Load a program and start the controller. If the PLC does not start, replace the PLC.

8000H

Controller Stopped

When this bit is set alone, it indicates that a stop command has been issued by a programming device. If this is not the case, the power supply could be suspected as the cause. Connect a programming device and issue a Start PLC command. When this bit is set, there is usually another bit set along with it.

Error bits are usually set in combinations of 2 or more. For example:

  • System Stop Error 8020 (1000000000100000)
  • 8000 = Peripheral port stop
  • 0020 = Bad coil used table
  • 8020

4000H

Bad I/O Map/X-Mem Error

This error will occur if there is more than 1 I/O drop configured and there is no remote I/O driver (CRP Module) in the local rack. Either install CRP module in the local rack with the PLC or reconfigure the PLC for only one drop.

2000H

PLC Not Configured

The PLC has no configuration and no program. Reload the PLC program with a programming device and start the controller. If the controller starts, cycle power to the rack. If the PLC does not come up running, replace the power supply and reload again. If the controller fails again after power cycle, replace the PLC.

NOTE: This error code may have another error in conjunction with it.

0400H

SON did not Start Segment SON

Start of node. Could be caused by illegal input from Modbus programming device. Reload the program and start the controller. If the PLC does not start, replace the controller. If the new PLC still does not start, the program may have an error in it. Verify by downloading another program. If the program is corrupt, create a new program configuration offline, and copy and paste the original networks into newly created program.

0200H

Bad Power-Down Checksum

The contiguous running RAM diagnostic failed. First, try to reload the program and start the controller. Then, cycle the power to the PLC to see if it continues to run. If the controller fails again, replace the power supply and reload and start the PLC. If this does not correct problem, replace the PLC.

0100H

Bad Number Of Segments

Usually caused by incomplete loading of the program or No I/O-EOL and then attempting to start the PLC. Reload again or try another program.

0080H

Watchdog Expired

Usually occurs with another error. Typically a CPU failure, replace the PLC.

0040H

Real Time Clock Failed

Replace the PLC.

0020H

CPU Diag Fail/Coil Used

Coil Used table does not match user logic. Possible causes:

1. The battery coil is not configured or configured incorrectly. Especially common if program is being relocated from another program.

2. May happen after a program has been relocated from a large Quantum, especially if altered with offline software.

0010H

Remote I/O head failure

The CRP 932 RIO driver has failed, replace the board.

0008H

Invalid Node Type

Usually occurs when loading or relocating from a PLC supporting a DX function block that is not supported or configured in the target Quantum. For example, loading a program with a custom loadable into a Quantum that is not configured for that particular loadable. If this is the case, that loadable must be included in the loadable section of the configuration using the offline programming software.

0004H

Logic Checksum Error

Calculated user logic checksum does not agree with stored checksum. Can be caused by an illegal change of memory or bad RAM memory. This could also be caused by a defective power supply. Try reloading the program first and restart the controller. If the PLC will not run, replace the PLC and try again. If the controller continues to fail after replacement, change the power supply.

0002H

Backup Cksm Err/Illegal

May happen if coils are disabled and you attempt to Disabled run in the optimize mode. The optimize mode does not allow disabled coils to exist in state ram. Enable all coils if possible. This error can also be caused by a defective CPU. Try to reload program and start. If not successful, replace the PLC.

0001H

Illegal Configuration

Could be caused by memory modification through the Modbus or Modbus Plus ports. Try to restart the PLC, and if no response, try to reload the program. If the controller still does not start, replace the PLC.

Communication Errors

The following table lists some examples of communication errors. A complete list of errors is available in the Modicon documentation that you received with your Modicon PLC.

Common Concept Error Messages

The following table lists some examples of Common Concept Error Messages. A complete list of errors is available in the Modicon documentation that you received with your Modicon PLC.

PLC Errors

The following table lists some examples of common PLC Errors. A complete list of errors is available in the Modicon documentation that you received with your Modicon PLC.

Code Generating Errors Occurring on the PC

The following table lists some examples of Code Generating Errors Occurring on the PC. A complete list of errors is available in the Modicon documentation that you received with your Modicon PLC.

The following errors are generated on the PC. Errors in the range from 1 to 10,000 are environment resource errors.

Error

Description

Caused By

Possible Solutions

801

Error opening loadable

Concept can't find a loadable on the disk when doing a compare or download

Make sure all your loadables are in the Concept\\datdirectory

11365

DBV error 905

This can occur if you delete any of the p1 - p4 files or any of the c0-c5 files.

The problem could also occur if you copy files from one location to another and do not bring all the files.

Export project and reimport

11367

DBV error 906

Unable to open TAF (report /work file for database) or DBL (Database Log File) or LOG file

Close Concept, then delete files with the extensionq1andq2in the project (Concept 2.0 or newer only).

If this fails, export/import project.

If exporting and importing fails, use a backup copy of the project.

If using a backup copy of the project fails, call technical support.

11406

OOPS

Program has a bug

Record detailed information leading up to the error and send this information to technical support.

Close Concept, then delete files with the extensionq1andq2in the project (Concept 2.0 or newer only).

If this fails, export/import project

If exporting and importing fails, use a backup copy of the project.

If using a backup copy of the project fails, call the company's technical support.

If you have an error that is not on the list, please note the circumstances and report this to technical support.

Connecting Laptop PC Directly to a PLC

Make sure the laptop is connected through the communications card to the programming port on the front of the PLCs processor through the supplied cable and that the laptop is started.

From the main window, click Utilities and then click Configuration.

  1. Go to Concept Main Menu (Online or Offline).
  2. Select # 7 UTILITIES.
  3. Select # 1 CONFIGURATION.
  4. Select # 3 COMMUNICATION SETUP.
  5. Select # 1 PORT/ADAPTER.
  6. Select COM 1.
  7. Press ESC, then Press Y, and then press ENTER to save changes.
  8. Connect cable from Laptop to PLC.
  9. You can now connect to the PLC using Taylor Online Software.


Figure 39: Connecting a Laptop PC Directly to a PLC

Connecting a Laptop PC to the Modbus Plus Network

Make sure the laptop is connected through the communications card to the 9-pin adapter through the supplied cable and that the laptop is started.

  1. Go to Concept Main Menu (Online or Offline).
  2. Select # 7 UTILITIES.
  3. Select # 1 CONFIGURATION.
  4. Select # 3 COMMUNICATION SETUP.
  5. Select # 1 PORT/ADAPTER.
  6. Select:
    • Adapter 0
    • Timeout 2 sec
    • Interrupt - 5D
  7. Press ESC, then press Y, and then press ENTER to save changes.
  8. Connect cable from the MODBUS PLUS network to the PC as shown.
  9. You can now connect to any PLC using Taylor Online Software.


Figure 40: Connecting a Laptop PC to the MODBUS Plus Network

Monitoring a Modicon 984 Using a Personal Computer

This procedure will let you make changes to the 984 programmable controller.

  1. Turn on the computer and wait for the start-up screen to appear.
  2. Select the software icon.
    • The Concept logo is displayed.
  3. Press ENTER to display the main menu.
  4. Press F8 (online).
  5. When the next menu is displayed, press F1 (select device).
  6. Enter the control cabinet number and press ENTER.
    • The message "Database options ENTER-select/create ESC-do not use database" appears.
  7. Press ENTER.
    • A list of program databases stored on the computer hard disk opens.
  8. Using the cursor keys, highlight the desired database and then press ENTER.
    • The online main menu opens.
  9. Press F2 (logic) to start the monitor/change sequence.
  10. When prompted for the MODBUS device address, enter the control cabinet number and press ENTER.
  11. When the Segment Summary screen opens, press ENTER.
    • The mode is initially monitor mode and network #1 is displayed.
  12. To move to another network, press N.
  13. Enter the new network number, then press ENTER.
    • A highlighted box near the upper right corner of the screen preceded by the letters "AR" displays the network number. Pressing Page Up or Page Down moves up or down one network at a time.
  14. To make changes in the program, the 984 must be in the Program mode and the Memory Protect key switch must be in the OFF position. After verifying that the Memory Protect switch is in the OFF position, press ALT+P to toggle Program mode.
  15. To change a contact address or timer/counter preset, place the cursor over the element to change, and then enter the new contact address or preset value. The value that was just entered should appear in the AR: block. Press CTRL +ENTER to save any changes.
  16. To change a contact, place the cursor on the element to change. Press F7 for a list of instructions and select the new element from the list using the Up and Down arrow keys. Pressing ENTER changes the element to the newly selected element.
  17. To exit from the program, press ESC and then press Y when prompted. Pressing ENTER returns to an earlier menu display.
  18. Press ESC again and press E when prompted. Pressing ENTER again causes the computer to display an earlier menu.
  19. Press E to exit to DOS.

Loading Programs into Modicon 984 from Personal Computer

The following procedure will load any 984 program stored on the computer hard disk into the 984 memory.

  1. Use the programming cable to connect computer to 984 programmable controller.
  2. Turn on computer and wait for start-up screen to appear.
  3. Select software icon.
  4. The Concept logo along with other information is now displayed. Press ENTER to display the main menu.
  5. Press F8 (online).
  6. Press F6 (loader operations).
  7. Press F1 (select database).
  8. Using the cursor keys, highlight the desired database, which is typically the control cabinet number or the area controlled, and then press ENTER.
  9. Press F3 (read/write controller).
  10. Press F2 (write to controller).
  11. A message appears prompting for the MODBUS address. Press ENTER if MODBUS address is correct or type the correct address and then press ENTER.
  12. The message "Controller and database match (or differ) ENTER-continue ESC-quit" appears. Press ENTER if the controller types are the same.
  13. Message "Cannot write to running controller"-stop or ESC-quit" appears. Press S. The processor stops and must be restarted after the program is loaded.
  14. When the program is loaded, the message "Starting controller"-continue ESC-quit" is displayed. Press C to continue or ESC to quit.
  15. The "Start in optimized mode n" message appears. Press ENTER.
  16. The "Controller running ENTER-continue" message appears. Press ENTER.
  17. The "Write to controller successful" ENTER-continue" message appears. Press ENTER.
  18. Press ESC until the main menu reappears.

Saving Programs from Modicon 984 to the Personal Computer

The following procedure load any 984 program stored on the Modicon 984 into the computer hard drive.

  1. Use the programming cable to connect computer to 984 programmable controller.
  2. Turn on computer and wait for start-up screen to appear.
  3. Select software icon.
  4. The Concept logo along with other information is now displayed. Press ENTER to open the main menu.
  5. Press F8 (online).
  6. Press F6 (loader operations).
  7. Press F1 (select database).
  8. Using the cursor keys, highlight the correct database and press ENTER.
  9. Press F3 (read/write controller).
  10. Press F1 (read from controller).
  11. Type the MODBUS address of the controller and then press ENTER.
  12. The message "Database path and controller path match (or differ) ENTER-continue ESC-quit" appears. Press ENTER.
  13. The "Read from controller ENTER-continue ESC-quit" message appears. Press ENTER.
  14. When the program is copied from the controller onto the computer hard disk, the message "Read from controller successful" appears. Press ENTER to continue.
    • The read/write menu opens.
  15. Press ESC until the online main menu re-appears.

Modbus Plus Network Cabling Checkout

Equipment needed Volt/Ohm meter

The MODBUS PLUS network cabling can be checked out using an ohm meter.

  1. Before checking continuity, disconnect all network cable connectors from the node devices (PLCs, Bridges, Repeaters) associated with the segment of network to be checked.
  2. At any node device connector (drop cable), measure the resistance between pin 2 and 3 (the white and blue wires). The resistance should be in the range of 60 to 80 ohms.
  3. At each node device connector (drop cable), check for an open circuit between pin 2 and pin 1. Then check for an open circuit between pin 3 and pin 1. An open circuit should exist for both checks (infinite resistance).
  4. If your checks do not agree with these results, inspect the cable and all connections for damage or bad wiring, correct the condition, and then repeat steps 2 and 3. Once the network is verified, reconnect the node devices (PLCs, Bridges, Repeaters) and verify network operation by doing a network scan.

One Cabinet or Subsystem Malfunctions


Figure 41: Single Cabinet Troubleshooting Flow Chart

Multiple Cabinets or Subsystems Malfunction


Figure 42: Multiple Cabinets Troubleshooting Flowchart

Digital Dual Servo Controller

The digital Dual Servo Controller (DSC) is the card in the control cabinet that receives signals from the RSC and controls the speed of the induction belts.


Figure 43: Digital Dual Servo Controller Interface Board
If any of the major components are repaired or replaced you must verify controller settings before the equipment is returned to operation. These settings control belt speeds, acceleration and deceleration rates, and belt creep. In most cases, you will not replace parts of the board, but will replace the entire board.

The direction of rotation of a motor cannot be changed by changing the wiring of the motor power leads. The rotation of a motor is dependent only on the polarity of the signal to the servo controller from the interface board.

The Dual Servo Interface Board has four output connections along its bottom edge marked CW (clockwise) and CCW (counterclockwise). The direction of rotation of a motor is determined by which of these connectors the servo controller cable is plugged into. If a motor runs in the reverse direction, unplug the cable for its servo controller from the board and plug it into the other connector.

Servo Controller Start-up Procedure

The Servo Control Cabinets are fully tested with a servomotor before they are shipped. However, it is still advisable to use caution when first starting the induction servo drive system.

If you make a mistake during a procedure, you must complete the procedure before correcting the mistake.

The servo controller has to go through an Auto Tune sequence with a motor connected to the conveyor before it is ready for operation. The test procedure done at the factory is accomplished with a motor that is not connected to a load and therefore has different inertia than a complete system. This startup procedure must be followed to insure safe and accident-free operation.

  • Before proceeding, measure the incoming voltage to the cabinet.
    • The voltage measured should match the specifications for the cabinet.
  • Have someone (other than yourself or the person who installed the wiring) check the wiring to the motor cables against the Servo Controller drawings to insure they are wired correctly.
  • Check the connectors at the motor to make sure they are fully locked in place.
  • Check to make sure that the E-Stop Interlock from the remote cabinet is wired properly and that the remote cabinet is turned on.
    • If it is not possible to turn on the remote cabinet, temporarily disconnect the E-Stop input to the Servo Control Cabinet. Attach a temporary and obvious jumper wire between terminals E and F of terminal strip located on the left side of the sub panel (terminals G and H on ISC-2).
  • Place the SERVO POWER and SERVO RUN switches (1 and 2SW on the switch panel) to the center OFF position.
  • Place the four speed switches (P0 - P3) the Servo Interface Board to their center OFF position.
  • Turn OFF the circuit breaker on top of each servo controller.
  • Turn ON the control cabinet disconnect.
    • At this point the CABINET POWER ON light 1LTM will illuminate and the fluorescent light and the PLC has power.

Servo Controller Auto Tune Procedure

The Auto Tune procedure must be done for each servo controller in your system prior to starting operation. If you have a DSC system, you must first set up the MASTER controller and then the SLAVE controller. While you are tuning the master controller, the circuit breaker located on the top of the slave controller must be in the OFF position.

The Servo Controller Cabinet and drive is powered up and tested prior to leaving the factory. It will not automatically come up in the START UP PROCEDURE mode, so you will have to initiate this mode.

Before beginning this procedure:

  • Make sure that all of the switches on the dual servo interface board are in the center or OFF position.
  • Set 1SW and 2SW, located on the Switch/Filter Assembly, in the Service position. With the switches in this position, you will not have to run the rest of your sort system.
  • Press the SERVO ENABLE pushbutton located on the front of the control cabinet door.

You can now turn on the circuit breaker for the drive you are setting up. At this point the STATUS LED on the front of the controller should illuminate to a steady green.

If it is red then press the RESET pushbutton located on the cabinet door. If this does not remove the fault then check parameter 6, which will tell which fault is present. (See the Troubleshooting section of the manual) Repair the fault and continue.

  1. To initiate the START UP procedure:
    • Press the UP, DOWN, and LEFT arrows on the controller keypad simultaneously.
    • Within four seconds, press UP, LEFT, and ENTER simultaneously.
    • This accesses the Maintenance Programming level and two small overlapping rectangles will appear in the upper left corner of the display.
  2. To access parameter 128:
    • Press the DOWN arrow and VIEW/MODIFY PARAMETER will be displayed.
    • Press the DOWN arrow to get to the parameter mode.
    • Press the RIGHT or LEFT arrows until parameter 128 is displayed.
  3. To enter the EDIT mode.
    • Press the DOWN arrow to enable a parameter change.
    • A blinking double arrow will appear.
    • Press the UP arrow until INITIALIZE is displayed on the drive.
    • Press ENTER, wait five seconds, then press the UP arrow. The VIEW/MODIFY PARAMETERS will be displayed.
    • Power down the drive (panel), wait five seconds, then power it back up.
    • Once this step is complete, the drive is ready to auto tune. The display will read START UP PROCEDURE.
  4. Press the Servo Enable pushbutton located on the front of the control cabinet door.
  5. Press ENTER and then wait five seconds to continue.
    • The display will now read SETUP DRIVE WITH MOTOR DATA.
  6. Press ENTER to continue.
    • Display will read MOTOR TYPE.
  7. Select the motor type being used. This will be located on the motor plate in the CATALOG # box.
    • Press the UP and DOWN arrows until your motor type is displayed.
    • Press ENTER to select motor type.
    • The display should read WRITING DATA TO SERVO DRIVE.
    • When the drive is through writing data to the servo drive, the display will read EXECUTE MOTOR ROTATION TEST. This test assures that the motor cables have been connected correctly.
  8. Press ENTER to continue.
  9. Now press ENTER. The display will now read ENABLE TO STRT ROTATION TEST.
  10. Place the P0 toggle located on the servo interface board, in the MAN position to enable the drive.
    • The ENABLE LED on the front of the servo drive controller will illuminate.
    • A correctly wired drive will rotate the motor clockwise at 30 rpm for five seconds, stop for two seconds, then rotate the motor counterclockwise for five seconds, and then stop. If the motor runs away or does not rotate, verify that both of the cables are correctly wired. A runaway condition is the result of incorrect feedback from the resolver.
    • The display will now read DISABLE DRIVE TO CONTINUE.
  11. Place the P0 toggle in the center or OFF position. Wait 5 seconds.
    • The drive will display PRESS ENTER TO EXIT MOTOR TEST.
  12. Press ENTER. Wait five seconds.
    • The display will now read ZERO ANALOG VELOCITY OFFSET.
  13. Press ENTER.
    • This mode is used to set the ZERO offset of the drive to remove any creep in the induct belt. Once this test has been completed, the induct belt should not move when just the P0 signal is on. When the drive is ready to initiate the test, the display will read ENABLE TO STRTZERO VEL OFFSET.
  14. Place the P0 switch on the Servo Interface Board in the MAN position.
    • The display will read JUMPER ANALOG VELOCITY INPUTS.
  15. Press ENTER.

    • The P0 switch has already placed zero volts on the analog input.
    • The display should now read NOW ZEROING VELOCITY OFFSET. The drive can take up to 60 seconds to zero the offset. If zeroing was successful, the display will show VELOCITY ZERO COMPLETE.
    • Press ENTER. The display will readOFFposition. Wait five seconds.
      • If the velocity offset sequence is successful, the display will showANLG VEL GAIN.
    • SelectCW and CCW velocity limits.
  16. Check motor plate for proper maximum motor speed and enter both values.
    • The drive will now prompt for the resolver cable length used on your system. This is the value for the length (in feet) of the cables you are using, i.e., 15, 30, and 50 feet or longer if required.
  17. Use the UP or DOWN arrows to select the proper length.
  18. Press ENTER. Wait five seconds.
    • The display should now readOFFposition.
    • The circuit breaker located on the top of the drive should still be in theAUTO TUNE CURRENT LIMITandWARNING ## MTR REVS POSSIBLE.
    • Press ENTER again.
      • The display should readENABLE DRIVE TO EXECUTE AUTOTUNE.
    • Place the P0 switch on the DSIB in theDISABLE DRV TO CONTINUE. Place the P0 toggle totwice. Wait five seconds. The display will readPress ENTER.

Setting Manual Parameters

Once the Servo Controller Auto Tune Procedure is complete, there are five parameters in the servo controller that must be manually adjusted for the induction system to perform optimally. These parameters, and the recommended values, are:

Set these parameters, one at a time, using this procedure:

  1. Press the UP, DOWN, and LEFT arrows simultaneously.
  2. Press the DOWN arrow twice to enter MODIFY mode.
  3. Display the parameter using the RIGHT and LEFT arrows. Press DOWN to edit the value.
  4. Use the RIGHT and LEFT arrows to move the cursor to the selected digit.
  5. Use UP and DOWN arrows to change value.
  6. Press ENTER to store the new parameter value.
  7. Use the RIGHT and LEFT arrows to display the next parameter. Press DOWN to edit.
  8. Continue to cycle through steps 3 through 6 for the remaining parameters.
  9. When all parameters have been modified, press the UP arrow and ENTER simultaneously to return to run mode.

This modifies the parameter values and saves them in memory until power is turned off to the drive. To permanently save the new values to EEPROM, perform the "Saving the Servo Controller Auto Tune Settings" procedure.

Saving the Servco Controller Auto Tune Settings

  1. Press the UP, DOWN, and LEFT arrows simultaneously.
  2. Within four seconds, press UP, LEFT, and ENTER simultaneously.

    • This accesses the Maintenance Programming level and two small overlapping rectangles will appear in the upper left corner of the display.
  3. Press the DOWN arrow twice.
  4. Use the RIGHT and LEFT arrows to access parameter ''128.
  5. Press the DOWN arrow to allow edit.
  6. A blinking double arrow will appear.
  7. Press the UP arrow three times to select the SAVE option.
  8. Press ENTER to save values to EEPROM.
  9. Press the UP arrow and ENTER simultaneously to return to run mode.

Changing Motor Rotation


Figure 44: Digital Dual Servo Controller Interface Board

The direction of rotation of a motorcannotbe changed by changing the wiring of the motor power leads. The rotation of a motor is dependent only on the polarity of the signal to the servo controller from the interface board.

The Dual Servo Interface Board has four output connections along its bottom edge markedCW(clockwise) andCCW(counterclockwise). The direction of rotation of a motor is determined by which of these connectors the servo controller cable is plugged into. If a motor runs in the reverse direction, unplug the cable for its servo controller from the board and plug it into the other connector.

Use these steps to determine motor rotation for your induct system:

  1. Place all Ratios switches (R0 - R3) to the Service position.
    • This sets the ratio between master and slave servos at 75%.

    If the motor jerks and oscillates rapidly, check the power wiring from the servo controller to the motor. This symptom indicates incorrect phase wiring to the motor.

  2. Move speed switch P1 on the interface board to MAN position.
    • The motor should start and run at the slow system speed. A DSC system should have the slave motor running at 75% speed of the master servo.

    If any belt travels backwards, turn off the power. Disconnect the servo drive cable and reconnect to the other output connector on the Servo Interface Board.

    NOTE:The belts on the conveyor have not been tracked at this point and should not be run except for brief periods of time. If the motor is left running, damage to the belts may result.

  3. Turn Ratio switches R1 and R3 to OFF.
    • The slave servo will move at half its previous speed.
  4. Momentarily move the speed switch P2 to the MAN position.
  5. Verify that each belt runs faster.
    • Gapping belt at its nominal system speed, pregapping belt at one-half its nominal.
  6. Momentarily move the speed switch P3 to the MAN position.
  7. Verify that the belt runs at the fast speed.
  8. Turn all three speed switches OFF.

Successful performance of these steps verifies that the servo drive system is operational. Before proceeding further, the belts must be tracked (See the "Belt Speed Adjustments" section on page 11 for more information.) Turn ON all Ratio switches (R0 - R3). Set Speed switches P1 (LOW speed), P2 (NOMINAL speed), or P3 (HIGH speed) to their MAN positions as required to operate the belts while tracking.

Belt Speed Adjustments

The RSC is capable of controlling each of the induction lines to four different speeds: STOPPED, LOW, NOMINAL, and HIGH speed. These definitions apply to the MASTER servo in the case of the DSC; the SLAVE servo will run at these speeds times a dynamically changeable ratio established by the RSC.

DSC Pregap Belt Speed

The regap belt speed is set in relation to the gapping belt speed using the pregap ratio. This ratio is dynamically adjusted by the RSC to control package spacing. This pregap speed and ratio must be adjusted to correspond with thePGNOMparameter in the RSC.

This ratio specifies the ratio of the pregap belt speed to the gapping belt speed with all the ratio control signals turned on. The PGNOM parameter is typically 75, indicating that the pregap belt will run 75% of the gapping belt speed.

Belt Speed Adjustments

The Rapid Sort Controller must be operating, and its I/O checked out and verified, to adjust the speeds of the induct belts. This is so the speed of the belts can be monitored using the PPI Test Mode.

When the RSC is operating, access the PPI Test mode by pressing P on the VDT main menu. Once in the PPI test mode, all of the system PPIs will be displayed along with the current speed of the belt they are mounted to. You will have to know which PPI in the system is attached to the induct belt.

  • The ENABLE LED on both servo controllers should be off.

1. Set all toggle switches on the Dual Servo Interface Board (DSIB) to centerOFFposition.

2. Set the circuit breaker located on the top of both servo controllers toONposition, supplying power to the unit.

  • Both of the servo controllers ENABLE LEDs should be on, however none of the belts should move.

3. Place the P0 switch on the DSIB in theMANposition.

  • All four of the belts should be stopped.

4. Place all four ratio toggle switches (R0 - R3), to theMANposition.

NOTE:

If any of the belts are moving, perform the MANUAL ZERO SPEED ADJUST procedure before continuing.

When the drives are set up correctly, there will be no conveyor movement when the P0 switch is on.

  • The fourth belt should now be running at the slow speed. This speed is usually determined by the Siemens Dematic Controls Engineer and is used for manually inducting product.

5. Place the P1 switch in theMANposition.

  • The conveyor speed will be displayed on the VDT screen and is continuously updated.
  • The speed of the second or pregap belt will also be displayed next to its PPI designations. This speed should be 75% of the value of the fourth belt speed. If it is not, then you must adjust potentiometerR46. When the second belt speed is properly adjusted to 75% of the fourth belt speed, then the ratio adjustment is complete.

6. Rotate potentiometer P1 on the Servo Interface Board to set the desired speed.

  • The fourth belt should now be running at the same speed as specified in the RSC parameter0014,NOMIND.

7. Now place the P2 switch in theMANposition.

  • Speed should match the listed parameter speed (NOMIND).

8. Adjust potentiometer P2 until the correct speed is displayed on the VDT screen.

  • The fourth belt should now be running at the same speed as set in the RSC parameter0018,MAXSP.

9. Now place the P3 toggle in theMANposition.

  • Speed should match the listed parameter speed (MAXSP).

10. Adjust potentiometer P3 until the correct speed is displayed on the VDT screen.

Once the speeds are properly set, you are ready to set up the acceleration parameters.

11. Place all of the toggle switches located on the dual servo interface board to theAUTOposition.

12. PressF10on the VDT keyboard to display the main screen.

Ramp Adjustments

The acceleration and deceleration rates for the inducts are set prior to shipment. They should be verified and readjusted if necessary at the time of commissioning. Rates are set by using the RSC to create a cycle of accelerations and decelerations. The actual acceleration and deceleration rates are alternately displayed on the VDT, as are the desired values.

1. Set the SERVO POWER (1SW) and the SERVO RUN (2SW) to theAUTOposition.

2. Press the SERVO ENABLE (2PBM) pushbutton located on the control cabinet door.

3. Set the P0 P3 switches toAUTO.

  • The screen will prompt you to enter the password.

4. PressDon the RSC keyboard to enter the sorter DIAGNOSTICS mode.

5. After entering the correct password, press any key to stop the self-test.

  • The RSC starts cycling induct 1 and displays the acceleration and deceleration rates.

6. PressHto enter the HIGH SPEED SERVO INDUCTION CALIBRATION mode.

  • The second induct, if present, will begin to cycle.

7. Press the UP arrow.

  • The #1 PREGAP conveyor will cycle.

8. Press the UP arrow again.

9. Press the UP arrow one more time.

The #2 PREGAP conveyor will cycle.

10. When setup is complete, pressF10to return to RUN mode.

Gapping Belt Ramp Requirements

The required gapping belt acceleration and deceleration rates are specified asRAMPin the Factory Parameters.

To set the acceleration rate on the MASTER servo controller, adjust potentiometerR19until the value matches the value in the RAMP parameter. These potentiometers are 20-turn potentiometers and the rate changes approximately 1/100 G with each half-turn of the potentiometer.

To set the deceleration rate on the MASTER servo controller, adjust potentiometerR20until the value matches the value in the RAMP parameter.

Pregap Belt Ramp Requirement

The required pregap belt acceleration and deceleration rates are specified asPGRMPin the Factory Parameters.

To set the acceleration rate on the SLAVE servo controller, adjust potentiometerR59until the value matches the value in the PGRMP parameter. These potentiometers are 20-turn potentiometers and the rate changes approximately 1/100 G with each half turn of the potentiometer.

To set the deceleration rate on the SLAVE servo controller, adjust potentiometerR60until the value matches the value in thePGRMPparameter.

Once you have completed the setup of the ACCEL/DECEL parameters, the system is setup and ready for operation.

Manual Zero Speed Adjust

Manual adjustment of the Zero Speed Offset must be performed if the induct belt creeps when the P0 input is the only input on after the Auto Tune cycle is complete.

The most likely cause of belt creep occurs when setting up a DSC on a four-belt high-speed induct application. The master servo can usually be nulled satisfactorily by the Auto Tune procedure and by adjusting the P0 potentiometer on the Servo Interface Board. The slave servo, however, may not be nulled at this point and if the P0 potentiometer is adjusted to remove creep from the slave unit, the master drive will start to creep. The creep from the slave unit should be nulled by manually adjusting the speed of the drive.

  • The drive should be energized and enabled (Switch P0 on the DSIB is set toMAN).

1. Enter the MODIFY mode of the servo controller by pressing the UP, DOWN, and LEFT arrows simultaneously.

2. Press the DOWN arrow to enterVIEW/MODIFY PARAMETERmode.

3. Press the DOWN arrow again to enter theMODIFYmode.

4. Press RIGHT or LEFT arrows to choose the parameter and then the DOWN arrow to enter theEDITmode.

5. Select parameter210.

  • When the parameter is set to a point where the induct belt no longer moves, you must save the value in the parameter to EEPROM.

6. When parameter210is displayed, use the RIGHT and LEFT arrows to position the cursor and the UP and DOWN arrows to increase or decrease the value until the conveyor stops moving. Press ENTER to have the change take effect.

7. Press UP and ENTER simultaneously.

8. Press the UP, DOWN, and LEFT arrows simultaneously

  • This is the Maintenance Programming level.

9. Within four seconds, press UP, LEFT, and ENTER simultaneously.

10. Access parameter252, enter a value of1, then press ENTER.

11. Press the LEFT or RIGHT arrows to access parameter128.

12. Press the DOWN arrow, then the UP arrow three times and selectSAVE.

13. Press ENTER to save the parameters to EEPROM.

14. Press UP and ENTER simultaneously to return to Run mode.

Dynamic Accumulator Pressure Adjust

The airpressureon the Dynamic Accumulator must be adjusted to control line pressure on the packages feeding the induction belts. This adjustment requires judgment, and must be done with the system operating.

  1. Queue a slug of product on the Dynamic Accumulator by holding back the first package.

    • 20 feet of product is adequate.
  2. Gradually release the first package.

    • Do not introduce gaps between trailing packages.
  3. Watch the action of the packages feeding onto the first induct belt as gapping adjustments raise and lower the speed of the belt.
  4. Adjust the pressure so it is between the upper and lower limits defined next:

    • If the pressure is too high, the dynamic accumulator will push hard enough to slide packages across the first belt when the induct belt slows down.
    • If sliding occurs on the full length of the first belt, short gapping on the sorter will occasionally occur.
    • Reduce the pressure so sliding does not occur farther than about half the length of the first belt.
  5. Lower air pressure limit:

    • If the pressure is too low, gaps will develop between packages when the induct belt speeds up. These gaps may reduce system throughput. Increase the pressure so gaps between packages close up prior to the first induct belt.

Safety Procedures

The ability to work safely with automatic conveying systems is important. This applies whether using the conveyors or performing maintenance on the system. Certain guidelines exist which allow the use of the conveyors without undue danger.

Before any maintenance is performed on a conveyor or any of its components, the conveyor drive motor should be turned off using the motor disconnect switch located near the drive. After the disconnect switch is turned off, a locking device should be placed on the disconnect switch to prevent accidental starting of the conveyor during a maintenance procedure. In lieu of locking the motor disconnect switch off, the control cabinet main disconnect switch may be locked in the off position. The locking device used to lock off a disconnect switch should be tagged with the name of the person placing the lock on the disconnect. This lock should not be removed without the express consent of the person identified on the tag. If it is suspected that a maintenance procedure has been completed and the lock left in place unintentionally, the conveyor should be checked carefully to determine that no one will be endangered if the unit is started.

Cable operated switches and E-Stop pushbuttons are provided at various places throughout the conveyor system. When operated, these switches stop conveyors in the vicinity of the switches. It is important that access to these devices be maintained at all times.

Start/Stop controls are provided for operation of the system. System operators should know the location and functions of these devices. Untrained operators should not be allowed to operate the system.

Chain guards and other safety devices are installed as part of the system. Before any of these guards are removed for maintenance procedures, the conveyor should be locked out as previously described. The guards should be re-installed before the conveyor is started. Finger guards are provided to prevent catching of fingers between rollers and drive belts. These should be replaced if broken or missing. Pop-out rollers are installed at transitions from one conveyor to the next. If a hand or other object is pulled underneath this roller, it will lift freely, preventing injury or damage. These rollers should never be locked into position.

Maintenance should be performed only by trained and authorized personnel. Conveying equipment should not be modified without approval from Siemens Dematic.

Persons working on or around should take care to keep their hands, clothing etc. out of the conveyor equipment. Riding on conveyors is an unsafe practice and is prohibited. All persons using the conveyor system should be properly trained in loading the conveyor correctly and safely. When starting a conveyor system, the operator should first visually check the area to insure that no one will be endangered when the conveyor starts.

Any unsafe condition or operating practice should be reported for immediate action. If a conveyor is unsafe, it should be stopped until the condition is corrected.

Control Cabinet Wiring

Standard Color for Control Cabinet Wiring

Component

Color

480 Volt Motor Leads

Black

120V Hot Conductor

Red

120V Neutral Conductor

White

120V I/O Conductor

Red

DC Voltage (+)

Blue

DC Voltage (-)

Gray

Ground

Green w/ Yellow Stripe

Field Wiring

Standard Color for Field Wiring

Component

Color

480 Volt Motor Leads

Brown, Orange, Yellow

120V Hot Conductor

Pink

120V Neutral Conductor

White

120V I/O Conductor

Red

120V Interlock Wires

Yellow w/ Red Stripe

(May be Black, Purple, or Brown in older sites.)

DC Voltage (+)

Blue

DC Voltage (-)

Gray

Ground

Green or Green w/ Yellow Stripe

Drawing Numbering

Project drawings begin with a P and are followed with a 10 digit number. The first six and last four digits are separated with a hyphen.

The first six digits, or prefix, of the drawing number are the project number for the entire job.

The last four digits, or suffix, of the drawing number designate the specific drawing number and are unique.


Figure 45

Electrical control cabinet drawings are numbered with the first two digits of the suffix corresponding to a cabinet number. For example, the drawings associated with control cabinet 1 (CC-1) would have a suffix of 01XX.

The last two digits in the suffix are the sheet number unless the following standard drawing numbers are used.

NOTE:

This is a general standard. Your drawings may have a specific numbering system. See the Index sheet of your drawings for more information.

Drawing

Title

XX00 or AAA

Index Sheet

XX01 XX04

Beginning of Motor Wiring Diagrams

XX05 XX09

Beginning of Schematic Wiring

XX10 XX39

Beginning of I/O Wiring

XX50

Cabinet Layout Drawing Door

XXLX

Electrical Physical Layout

XXL9

External Bill of Material

XX98 (and lower)

Control Station Assembly

XX99

Control Cabinet Bill of Material

Basic Drawing Standards

Figure 46 is a standard title block for a controls drawing. The three areas are the main areas used to identify the drawing.


Figure 46: Standard Title Block

  • Name and Type of Drawing This area will have a description of what the drawing shows. It will also tell you what kind of drawing it is (a layout drawing, a schematic, etc.)
  • Project Number, Control Cabinet, and Page Number This area will have the project number for your site, the control cabinet the drawing is showing, and the sheet number.
  • Revision Level This area will show the revision level for the drawing. This letter may be needed if you have to talk to a support technician.

Types of Drawings

There are several types of drawings in a control cabinet drawing set.

  • Index Sheet Provides a complete listing of the drawings associated with that cabinet. Includes control cabinet and control station drawings, electrical physical layouts, and miscellaneous drawings.
  • Motor Wiring Diagram Shows the feeder wiring from the building, the control cabinet disconnect and fusing, the control transformer, and the motor wiring distribution. All three-phase wiring is shown by one line representation.

The motor wiring distribution consists of a distribution block which splits the load side of the disconnect into appropriate branches. There is always one branch split for the control transformer, and additional branches for motors as required by the particular control cabinet.

Each branch of the motor wiring is split into legs for individual motors. Each leg depicts a single motor and its associated equipment. Included in the branch is the number and size of the fuses, starter, thermal overload relay, terminals, disconnect switch, motor unit number, motor horsepower, and full load amperage of the motor. Any special equipment associated with the motor is also shown, such as soft starts, brakes, or auxiliary disconnect poles.

  • Schematic Wiring Diagram Shows wiring of the control transformer and the control wiring. The sheets used for schematic wiring depict miscellaneous devices that do not necessarily require an I/O point such as emergency stop relays, local emergency stop lights, and power supplies. Interlocks to other control cabinets may also be shown on these sheets.
  • Input/Output Wiring Diagrams Shows the wiring of the input and output modules for the PLCs. The first series of drawings represents the slots allocated for the input modules. The second series of drawings represents the slots allocated for the output modules.
  • Control Cabinet Layout Shows the physical location of components mounted on the subpanel, on the doors, and on the exterior of the control cabinet.

These are primarily the assembly drawings of the control cabinet, which are drawings P###### XX50 and P######-XX51.

  • PLC Grounding and Switch Settings Provides information relative to setting up various PLC components.

NOTE:

Whenever any PLC components are installed or replaced, these settings should be carefully examined and set accordingly.

  • Control Station Drawings Shows the assemblies for the control stations associated with a particular control cabinet (if needed). The component layout, bill of material, and if necessary, the schematic are shown on a one sheet per assembly basis.
  • Bills of Material Lists all the components used in the control cabinet assembly. The listing shows the symbol, description, manufacturer, manufacturer part number, Siemens Dematic part number, and quantity of each component.

Nomenclature

Each conveyor unit is numbered with a two-part nomenclature (Figure 47).


Figure 47: Two-Part Nomenclature

The prefix is a two-letter code that represents the media type and function of the conveyor unit. Together they depict the type of conveyor and the intended function of that conveyor.

The suffix is a four-number code set off from the alpha prefix by a "+" sign. It will be an unique number from zero through 9999. The first two numbers of the suffix indicate a specific physical area and the last two numbers are numbered in ascending order for each unit in that area. For example, RT+1101, WG+1102, and RT+1103 would be different units in a similar location. Where units are similarly associated or added between existing units, a letter will be added to the numeric suffix (For example, RT+1101, RG+1101A, RT+1101B, etc.).

Mechanical Equipment

Media Type

Function

Belt (B)

Accumulation (A)

Chain (C)

Diverter (D)

Chute (CH)

Extendible (E)

Pusher (P)

Gravity (G)

Roller (R)

Justify/Align (J)

Shoe (S)

Reciprocating (R)

Vertical (V)

Sorter (S)

Wheel (W)

Transportation (T)

Transfer (X)

Electrical Equipment

Designator

Device Type

AH

Alarm Horn

BC

Beacon

B

Brake

CC

Control Cabinet

COS

Cable Operated Switch

CR

Control Relay

CS

Control Station

ES

E-Stop

FS

Foot Switch

LS

Limit Switch

LT

Light or Beacon

M

Location on Door

MTR

Motor

MS

Motion Sensor

PE

Photoeye

PC

Pull Cord

PB

Pushbutton

PE

Photoeye

PPI

Pulse Position Indicator

SOL

Solenoid

SS

Selector Switch

T

Transformer

Schematics

Schematics are laid out in ladder logic, where the electrical flow is represented with a "ladder" (Figure 48).

  • Ladders represent control voltage. The left rail is hot. The right rail is neutral.
    NOTE:The neutral rail is not a ground.
  • Rungs have line numbers, based on the sheet number. Line numbers are listed in NNLL format, where NN is the sheet number and LL is the line number. There are 16 rungs possible per ladder, and two ladders can be displayed per sheet.

Wire Numbering

Wire numbering has two basic formats: general wiring and I/O wiring.

General Wiring

General wiring is numbered starting at zero and going up.

  • If a wire number has a CC suffix, it is showing a field wire.
  • A wire number with a CC suffix and a terminal shows a field wire brought into the control cabinet.
  • A wire number without any suffix shows a wire internal to the cabinet.

I/O Wiring

I/O wires are numbered based on the I/O number. A wire inherits the five, or six, digit I/O address number if it is connected to an I/O point.

The suffix of the I/O wire number follows the same rules as a general wiring number.

Device Numbering

Three basic formats apply to device numbering:

  • Line Number Reference Devices that are not connected directly to an I/O point, such as those found on the general wiring schematics, are numbered according to the line number they are found on.
    • For example, the first COS on line 503 would be numbered 5030COS-xx, the second COS on line 503 would be numbered 5031COS-xx, and so on.
  • I/O Reference Devices that are wired directly to an I/O point inherit the I/O number. The format is IOIOIXX-CC (or IOIOIOXX-CC); where IOIOI is the I/O number, XX is the device designation, and CC is the control cabinet. For example, 01020ES-04 would be an E-stop on I/O 01020 in control cabinet 4.


Figure 48: Ladder Schematic Example


Figure 49: RSCC Sub-Panel Assembly Drawing Example